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Models of Evangelism

crossroadsToday at our ministry staff meeting at Eastbrook Church, we talked broadly about the topic of evangelism. We watched a video from the Exponential 2014 conference by Rick Richardson on six models of evangelism seen in 20th and 21st century evangelicalism:

  1. Evangelism as proclamation – exemplified in the life and ministry of Billy Graham
  2. Evangelism as discipleship – exemplified in the life and ministry of Dawson Trotman
  3. Evangelism as acts of service, justice, compassion and peace – exemplified in the life and ministry of John Perkins
  4. Evangelism as the demonstration of God’s power- exemplified in the life and ministry of John Wimber
  5. Evangelism as church planting and church growth – exemplified in the life and ministry of Bill Hybels
  6. Evangelism as the counter-cultural life of the alternative community – exemplified in the life and ministry of Shane Claiborne

Rick suggests that these six models of evangelism are mutually complementary and necessary in the life of the church, and that they can be traced throughout the 2,000 years of the church’s existence.

We had a fascinating discussion of which models we appreciate and which are harder to appreciate for each of us. We also wrestled with the fact that these are predominantly Western models and examples.

That being said, it was a helpful picture of what we want to do.

After that, we spent time studying how Jesus engaged evangelistically in His encounters with people from list below. We noted that Jesus: Read the rest of this entry »

 
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Posted by on September 9, 2014 in Ministry Reflections

 

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Vision Weekend at Eastbrook Church

This weekend at Eastbrook Church was the kick-off of our ministry year and I took the opportunity to refocus us on Jesus and our vision as a church. Our vision statement is:

To proclaim and embody the love of Jesus Christ in the city and in the world.

Along with that, we are focusing on six priorities (see below) with two focus words for the year: deep and wide.

The outline and video file for the message is below. You can listen to the message via our audio podcast here. You can also visit Eastbrook Church on VimeoFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

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Posted by on September 7, 2014 in Communication, Eastbrook, Uncategorized

 

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The Unselfish Way of Jesus

No one should seek their own good, but the good of others….I try to please everyone in every way. For I am not seeking my own good but the good of many, so that they may be saved. Follow my example, as I follow the example of Christ. (1 Corinthians 10:24, 33; 11:1)

The Apostle Paul’s theme in this section is the importance of thoughtfully seeking the good of others in our actions. We are not to selfishly pursue an individualistic good in what we do or how we live. This is Paul’s example, which he learned from Christ. The way of Jesus is the unselfish way.

Jesus’ Selfless Example
First, it is important to grasp Jesus’ selfless example. He endured the Cross for the joy set before Him, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of God’s throne (Hebrews 12:2). He did this so that He could bring many people into the glorious family of God. Jesus’ aim was to lead many to Himself by laying down His life. He aimed for a greater, selfless goal and we, too, should live selflessly for the greater aim of God’s purposes in this world and our lives.

Letting Go of Individualistic Good
At times this means, secondarily, that we must forego some apparent ‘goods’ that come into conflict with the good of others. For the believers in Corinth this meant considering certain freedoms they enjoyed, such as the eating of meals, in light of how those freedoms would effect others and their life of faith. When we see that certain actions or ways of living that we enjoy are inhibiting others from experiencing God, then we must reconsider what we are doing or how we are living. With that consideration in view, we may even need to let go of those actions or ways of life either temporarily or permanently. This, of course, flies in the face of self-actualization or the pursuit of total freedom so strongly promoted in our world today. In God, our grace-given freedom is a liberation from sin into a new sort of life characterized by God’s truth and righteousness. That way in God does not release us from all the demands of others but intricately binds us together with others under God.

Should We Seek Ill for Ourselves?
Third, we must understand that seeking the good of others does not mean seeking ill for ourselves. Pursuing ill for ourselves is not helpful for anyone. Without a doubt we may face trials and endure hardship in life, but seeking the good of others must also include good for ourselves. Paul’s words here are aimed at a sort of godless selfishness which does not take into account the lives of others. He is not asking the Corinthians – or us – to set aside helpful self-awareness or self-care. It is important that we move beyond guilt-ridden lies from the evil one that say any thought of ourselves is selfish and not honoring to God. It is important to note that the interpersonal element of the ‘Great Commandment’ given by Jesus reads: “love your neighbor as yourself” (Mark 12:31).

The equation here means acknowledging what we would like to seek for ourselves, yet placing it on the table of consideration with the needs of others before God’s caring and purposeful eye. Ultimately, we must say with our Savior, “Lord, not my will, but Yours be done.” Then we move forward, like Jesus, for the joy set before us in obedience to God with appropriate love for others in the unselfish way.

 
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Posted by on September 4, 2014 in Discipleship

 

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Connecting Together (discussion questions)

Here are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Connecting Together,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This was the second part of our series “Together” on what it means to be the church.

Discussion Questions:

  1. How would you define the church in your own words?
  2. We continue our series “Together” this week by looking at what it means to be the church relationally. This week, we will spend time primarily in Acts 2:1-47 and Colossians 3:12-17. Stop to ask God to speak to you. Then, read Acts 2 and Colossians 3:12-17 aloud.
  3. Peter’s first sermon in the book of Acts is followed by a dramatic response from his hearers. How would you describe the response to Peter’s sermon initially (verse 38-41) and in the days following (verses 42-47)?
  4. The church is not something created by human beings. Based on what you see here, as well as what you know from other portions of Scripture, what would you say is the source of the church?
  5. What do you think that the everyday life of the early church looked like? How does our life as a church look similar or different today? What does that make you think about?
  6. Last week, we looked at Ephesians 2 and the vastly different people who were brought together in the church. In Colossians 3:12-17, Paul exhorts these vastly different people to live together in some very specific ways. Which of Paul’s exhortations jumps out most to you? Why?
  7. How might you grow in grace as a member of Christ’s church based on what you are encountering here in Colossians 3?
  8. What is one specific truth or point of application that God is speaking to you through this study, and how will you live that out this week? Write it down. If you are in a small group, share your thoughts with one another.
 
 

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Connecting Together

Connecting TogetherWhat does it mean to be God’s people? How should we relate with one another as the church?

My message this past weekend, “Connecting Together,” touches upon these questions. This is the second part of a four-part series at Eastbrook Church entitled “Together.”

The outline and video file for the message is below. You can listen to the message via our audio podcast here. You can access both messages from “Together” series here. You can also visit Eastbrook Church on VimeoFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

 

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Together in Jesus Christ (discussion questions)

Here are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Together in Jesus Christ,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This was the first part of our series “Together” on what it means to be the church. This message was built out of Ephesians 2.

Discussion Questions:

1. When did you enter real, life-changing relationship with God through Jesus Christ? What happened? How did your life change?

2. This week we begin a four-week series entitled “Together” focused on what it means to be God’s people together. This week, we will spend time in Ephesians, chapter 2. Stop and ask God to speak to you. Next, read Ephesians 2 out loud.

3. The first ten verses of this chapter outline the basics of what salvation in Jesus Christ is all about. ‘Salvation’ is a churchy word that we don’t necessarily use a lot in our everyday lives. Ponder Paul’s words here and then put them into your own words. How would you describe what the message of Jesus is about as outlined in Ephesians 2:1-10?

4. Reflect for a moment on what this really means. Do you believe this truth or not? Do you order your life by this truth or not? If yes, then why? If no, then why not?

5. The next twelve verses focus more about the change of status and relationship that we experience because of what Jesus has done. Remember that the Hebrew Bible makes a distinction between Jews (that specific national-ethnic group called into relationship with God through His promises) and Gentiles (the non-Jewish nations). Paul is writing to a mostly Gentile audience in Ephesians. Why would Paul’s words here be significant to these readers?

6. What do you think it means that Jesus “himself is our peace” (Ephesians 2:14)? Why is this important?

7. The tabernacle—and, later, the temple—was the physical dwelling place of God in the Old Testament. How does Paul shift the idea of God’s dwelling place in verses 20-22? What is he really saying here? What might this mean for us today?

8. What is one specific truth or point of application that God is speaking to you through this study, and how will you live that out this week? Write it down. If you are in a small group, share your thoughts with one another.

 
 

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Together in Jesus Christ

Together in Christ
What is the center of the life of God’s people? What is it that really holds the church all together?

My message this past weekend, “Together in Jesus Christ,” addresses these very questions. This is the first of four weeks at Eastbrook Church in our series, “Together.”

The outline and video file for the message is below. You can listen to the message via our audio podcast here. You can access both messages from “Together” series here. You can also visit Eastbrook Church on VimeoFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

 

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