The Weekend Wanderer: 11 April 2020

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.


116036“Before Christ Rose, He Was Dead: The truth of Holy Saturday is that God is with us, even in our mortality” – There may not be a lot of attention in some Protestant churches to Holy Saturday, but that is the celebration of today. When Kelly and I attended an Anglican Church immediately during our latter years of college and both served on staff there afterwards, the Easter Vigil on Holy Saturday was a highlight of our year. Here is Travis Ryan Pickell reflecting on the meaning of Holy Saturday, and why it is so powerful for our faith.


merlin_170541216_a781cc8f-885d-4337-83d3-e626a77abebf-superJumbo“I Miss Singing at Church” – The Christian faith is a singing faith. Paul writes in Ephesians that believers should encourage “one another with psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit. Sing and make music from your heart to the Lord” (Ephesians 5:19). While our family does sing together, in the midst of COVID-19 one of the things I miss most is singing with other believers around me. Here is Tish Harrison Warren reflecting on the same sort of thing in The New York Times: “I miss the congregation singing at the church where I’ve served as a priest for three years. If I could hear them sing this morning, I wouldn’t mind if the person behind me was off key. I would even take a whole load of my least favorite songs, the ones I find plodding or cheesy or overdramatic, if I could just hear them sing with me.”


singing“People Are Remembering What Music Is Really For” – Speaking of singing, here is Spencer Kornhaber in The Atlantic highlighting the way people are engaging in good old-fashioned sing-alongs during this time. Perhaps it is a recovery of what music is really for. For those of us in singing churches, we likely already know this, but the implications for the broader culture are significant artistically and socially. “Here is the kind of crowd culture we can, when we’re lucky, enjoy during isolation. Everywhere, the coronavirus has turned empty streets into acoustically rich amphitheaters.”


Every Moment Holy“Every Moment Holy: New Liturgies for Daily Life” – I first became familiar with Every Moment Holy when our friends came over for brunch and we shared in one of these simple liturgies together. These simple liturgies open up aspects of everyday life to God, while simultaneously opening our awareness to God in the midst of everyday things. They have shared some free liturgies during the time of COVID-19 that you may find meaningful, such as “A Liturgy for Those Flooded by Too Much Information” or  “A Liturgy for Medical Providers.” Enjoy.


Priest taping photos in worship“With coronavirus shutdown, priest tapes photos of his parishioners to pews” – The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel offered this view into how different ministers are dealing with leading worship and preaching with empty pews during the time of COVID-19. Here is the rector of the Basilica of Saint Josaphat, Rev. Lawrence Zurek, borrowing an idea from creative priests in Italy, taping photos of his parishioners to the pews throughout the worship space.


Francis Collins“How NIH chief Francis Collins is trying to get people of faith to wake up to coronavirus realities” – Some of you may be familiar with Francis Collins through his book, The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief. You may not know that Collins is the longest-serving director of the National Institute of Health, which also makes him the supervisor of Dr. Anthony Fauci, who has featured so prominently in the press briefings related to COVID-19. Here’s a taste from this interview with Collins at The Washington Post: “There’s a natural instinct for people of faith who are loving and wish to give themselves to others who are hurting to rush in the direction of people who are vulnerable or who are suffering. And over the course of many centuries, people of faith have, to their great credit, put themselves in harm’s way. Right now, they could focus their efforts on trying to supply, nurture and support all of their flock who are struggling right now. This is stressful. This may lead to people having fears, anxiety and other mental-health issues. Pastors ought to be doing everything they can to maintain that connection but not put people at risk.”


Anna Wilson“Anna Wilson: I’m more than a basketball player and more than Russell Wilson’s sister” – A friend shared this ESPN interview with Anna Wilson with me last week, and I found it to be a really interesting read. As the title suggests, there is so much more to her story than her Stanford basketball career and her life as a sibling to football star Russell Wilson. Anna recounts how her faith in Christ has shaped her life in very profound ways, even in the midst of personal suffering.


45005996815_d784be17f1_o-1536x960“2,500 Museums You Can Now Visit Virtually” – In the midst of these terrible circumstances of the pandemic, there are some beautiful things happening. With reference to 2,500 museums that you can now visit virtually, Hakim Bishara provides a sort of top twelve list of museums you can visit while under “safer at home” restrictions.  If you really do not know what to do while stuck at home, don’t miss the chance to visit the Guggenheim Museum in New York, the National Gallery in DC, the British Museum in London, the Louvre in Paris, or some of these other gems.


 

Music: Matt Maher, “Christ is Risen,” from Alive Again

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

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