The Weekend Wanderer: 8 February 2020

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

The Course - Jessica Bruah“The Cancer Chair: Is suffering meaningless?” – Christian Wiman, American poet and Professor of the Practice of Religion and Literature at Yale Divinity School, writes about his journey with cancer and questions about the meaning of suffering. Always an astute craftsman of words (if you haven’t read My Bright Abyss, do yourself a favor and read it sometime soon!), Wiman brings together reflections on his own cancer, the book of Job, Friedrich Nietzsche, Simone Weil, Albert Camus, and the Cross of Christ.

 

0_DydTubCNbDSFL-mb“From the Abundance of the Heart” – Alan Jacobs shares an essay on a topic that more of us should think about, particularly in the social media era: the power of our words. Relating an experience of giving a lecture based on an essay he had written but not yet published, Jacobs encountered the sourness of his words as they came out of his mouth, bringing a sense of conviction about the fact that these were both his words and words of which he did not approve at the same. There are some interesting insights here about the words of Jesus: “The good person out of the good treasure of his heart produces good, and the evil person out of his evil treasure produces evil, for out of the abundance of the heart his mouth speaks” (Luke 6:45).

 

Vector picture of Human Evolution“What If We Don’t Have to Choose Between Evolution and Adam and Eve?” – When I was working as a college pastor in the early 2000s, we conducted a teaching series called “Hot Topics,” where we engaged with controversial issues facing students in relation to faith. One of those topics that continues to be hotly debated in certain circles is the relationship between creation and evolution. Just this past year, S. Joshua Swamidass, a computational biologist at Washington University in St. Louis, published The Genealogical Adam and Eve: The Surprising Science of Universal Ancestry in an attempt to change the terms of the debate. His book is up for a Reader’s Choice Award at InterVarsity Press. Here’s an interview with Swamidass about his book and his thought-provoking claims.

 

Dorothy Sayer mystery“‘No Divine Revelation, Feminine Intuition or Mumbo Jumbo’: Dorothy L Sayers and the Detection Club” – Dorothy Sayers, one of the most incisive writers and thinkers of her era, is perhaps known best today for her connection to the Inklings, a group of writer including J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis. Christians may know her for her radio play, The Man Born to Be King, or The Mind of the Maker, but Sayers was well-known for her mystery-writing with the Lord Peter Wimsey novels. Sayers founded the Detection Club to support mystery writing, and it apparently still exists today. Who knew?

 

rohr_edit“Richard Rohr Reorders the Universe” – These days I cannot seem to take more than a few steps within Christian circles without someone mentioning Richard Rohr. He is one of those authors whose influence looms large for those who are seeking to reengage with faith and spirituality in an ecclesially disillusioned age. There are certain impulses about Rohr that I appreciate, some theological moves that deeply concern me, and a few other things about him that just drive me nuts. Love him or hate him, you have to reckon with Richard Rohr in discussions of faith today. Back in July, I shared Matthew Milliner’s helpful “field guide” to Rohr, and just this week Eliza Griswold offered a more personal look Rohr and his influence in North America today.

 

Steve Gillen“Willow Creek’s interim pastor to step down as church drops top candidates to fill Hybels’ shoes” – Speaking of ecclesial disillusionment, Willow Creek continues to reel after the leadership crisis surrounding misconduct accusations against former Senior Pastor Bill Hybels. After the top two candidates for filling the Senior Pastor role were released by Willow Creek, Steve Gillen, Willow’s acting senior pastor, tendered his resignation effective March 17 because of the protracted nature of the search. Looming in the background are recent accusations that Dr. Gilbert Bilezikian, an influential founder of Willow Creek and mentor to Bill Hybels, has also been accused of sexual harassment and misconduct both at Willow Creek and during his time at Wheaton College. May God purify His church and have mercy upon His people.

 

Music: Asgeir, “Until Daybreak,” from Bury the Moon

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 20 July 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

5779.thumb“Richard Rohr: A Field Guide” – When you’re a pastor you encounter trends within people’s spiritual conversations that make you wonder what is going on. When an author is referenced often in conversation, you have to pay attention. A number of years ago, authors like Rob Bell or Donald Miller were some of those sort of authors. These days, I can barely take ten steps without someone mentioning Richard Rohr. Love him or hate him, you have to reckon with Richard Rohr in discussions of faith. About two months ago, I was thinking of writing an engagement with Rohr, but didn’t get to it. Just in time, Matthew Milliner steps up to provide this helpful “field guide” to Rohr.

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-15 at 10.41.30 AM“In Brooklyn, ‘tradpunk’ Christianity meets millennial counterculture” – I didn’t see this one coming. Tara Isabella Burton writes about “a goth garden party in Brooklyn, New York’s historic Green-Wood Cemetery with a few people I’d met on the fringe corners of what the internet.” She reflects on millennial faith, her specific Anglo-Catholic tradition, and the countercultural nature of Christianity. “At its core, Christianity is a faith of resistance, of questioning dormant assumptions, of breaking apart easy cycles of power and consumption. It’s been a faith of strangeness: and of strangers in a strange land. For me, at least, the addition of incense, or the old Rite 1 Liturgy, helps to highlight that strangeness. Keeping theology Weird is key to keeping it alive.”

 

<> on September 27, 2017 in Washington, DC.“House chaplain prays to cast ‘spirits of darkness’ from Congress” – “House Chaplain Pat Conroy’s opening prayer: ‘This has been a difficult and contentious week in which darker spirits seem to have been at play in the people’s house. In Your most holy name, I now cast out all spirits of darkness from this chamber, spirits not from You.'”

 

gettyimages-613689090_wide-f793694fd7703b4ad760ad27c9ef4406d30abdee-s1400-c85“Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?” – Via NPR: “Democrats this year are making a more determined effort to reach voters whose political preferences are driven in part by their religious faith. Two presidential candidates — Sen. Cory Booker and Mayor Pete Buttigieg — are recruiting faith advisers to help in their campaigns, and the Democratic National Committee has hired a new ‘faith engagement’ director, the Rev. Derrick Harkins….The new efforts have Democrats hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right, long a bedrock Republican constituency. Less clear is whether the outreach will resonate with those voters who make up the religious middle.”

 

91429“Pompeo: Why We’re Hosting the World’s Biggest Event on Religious Persecution” – From Christianity Today: “This week, the US State Department invited more than 100 countries to come to DC and discuss how to stop the dramatic decline of religious freedom worldwide. CT’s global director, Jeremy Weber, interviewed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on what has changed between last year’s first-ever ministerial on international religious freedom (IRF) and this week’s second, bigger event.”

 

Iraq ISIL“‘The situation is very vulnerable’: Iran-backed militias ethnically cleansing northern Iraq” – Given the discussion in the previous article, it is very pertinent to pay attention to what is happening in the Middle East in recent years. “The official story is that northern Iraq is at peace. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) has largely been defeated; the Iraqi Army and its allies are in charge. But for Christians, the persecution continues. Those who can are getting out. Those who stay are preparing themselves for more violence.”

 

Michigan Central“Michigan Central and the rebirth of Detroit” – My wife, Kelly, is from Detroit, so we always keep our eyes and ears open to the challenges and hopes of Motor City. The BBC offered an insightful look through the lens of the Michigan Central Railway Station. “Michigan Central was once one of the grandest railway stations in the United States – the gateway to a fabulously wealthy city, dominated by the auto industry….But Detroit’s days of lavish prosperity are long gone. The station has been closed and abandoned for more than 30 years. Its tower, like the keep of a derelict fortress, is a poignant symbol of a once-great city’s decline. Now Michigan Central is being given a new life by the industry that created Detroit’s wealth.”

 

A visitor looks at the view of Fountains Abbey near Ripon, northern England“H. S. Cross’s Absorbing World” – John Wilson’s review of H. S. Cross‘ latest book, Grievous, makes me want to run out and read this book. As Wilson mentions in his review, many of his readers may not be familiar with Cross, myself included, but his are enough to pique my interest toward wading into this long work, as well as Cross’ previous novel, Wilberforce. If you’ve read either, let me know what you think.

 

giant jellyfish“Giant jellyfish the size of a human spotted by divers off English coast” – Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction and the seemingly infinite wonders of the created world are stunning. “A giant jellyfish the size of a human has stunned a diver off the south-western coast of England. The incredible creature — a barrel jellyfish — was spotted near Falmouth by broadcaster and biologist Lizzie Daly, who described the encounter as ‘breathtaking.'” Keep your eyes open the next time you go swimming.

 

paul-simon-and-son“Paul Simon: Fathers, Sons, Troubled Water” – Paul Simon’s album Graceland usually makes an appearance during our family roadtrips.  The range of musicianship and the strong song-writing still captures my attention. I read this article by Daniel Drake in The New York Review of Books awhile back but forgot about it until finding it in my electronic “To Read” pile the other day. He writes: “A consummate adult rather than a perpetual teenager, he sang about the compromises of apartment living, the journey through sobriety, divorce, breakdowns, second marriages, second divorces, fatherhood, depression, baseball. At their best, his songs have an erudite lyrical grace that had developed from a tendency to pretension in his early folk records and would shade in his later albums into mystic mumbo-jumbo.”

Music: It seems like it would be a shame not to share some Paul Simon. Here’s “Diamonds on the Soles of His Shoes,” from Graceland: The African Concert, featuring Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]