The Good News of Jesus

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This weekend, as we celebrate the resurrection of Jesus at Eastbrook Church, we will begin a two-week message series exploring “The Good News of Jesus.” Drawing upon the post-resurrection accounts within the Gospel of John, we want to bring into sharper focus the ways in which Jesus brings good news to the world.

April 20/21 [Easter]: “The Good News of the Resurrected One” – John 20:1-10, 30-31
The resurrection of Jesus from death brings good news into our lives. As we celebrate Jesus’ resurrection, we will also explore three themes of how this is good news: light overwhelming darkness, freedom overcoming prisons, and life overpowering death.

April 27/28: “The Good News of New Beginnings” – John 20:11-21:25
After Jesus’ resurrection, John offer a series of encounters that Jesus has with real people. Each of these encounters sheds light on the way in which Jesus’ resurrection is good news: God’s presence in loss (Mary), God’s peace in fear (disciples in the upper room), God’s guidance in doubt (Thomas), and God’s restoration in failure (Peter).

Good Friday 2019

God is love. This is how God showed his love among us: He sent his one and only Son into the world that we might live through him. This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins. (1 John 4:8-10)

Join us for worship on Good Friday this year at Eastbrook Church at either of two service times: 12:00 or 7:00 PM.

Maundy Thursday 2019

Shortly before His arrest and crucifixion, Jesus gathered with His closest disciples in an upper room in Jerusalem to share the Passover meal together. During that time, Jesus washed His disciples’ feet and taught them deep truths of God’s kingdom. 

Join us for a Maundy Thursday service of worship with foot washing and communion at Eastbrook Church on Thursday, April 18, at 7 PM in Fellowship Hall.  Here is a video that our staff put together on the meaning of Maundy Thursday.

 

The Hunger to Leave a Legacy [Hungry for God]

As we enter into Holy Week and bring the climax to our Lenten journey, I concluded our series, “Hungry for God,” this past weekend at Eastbrook Church.

This weekend I explored the hunger to leave a legacy. Because this was Palm Sunday, I intertwined the exploration of legacy with Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem. This would definitely not be my normal manner of approaching the topic of legacy, but I went for it and you can explore it with me through the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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Hungry to Leave a Legacy

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About a year ago, our family went on a trip to Washington, DC, to take in the historic sites and museums. One thing you cannot help but notice are the monuments to one historic figure after another: George Washington, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and so many more Each monument tells a story about the legacy of how those figures impacted the nation and generations of people.

We all hunger to leave a legacy with our lives in one form or another. Most of us may not aspire to constructing a monument to our personal legacy in Washington, DC, (let alone somewhere else) but we all still desire to leave a meaningful legacy with our lives. In Ecclesiastes, the Teacher says that God has “set eternity in the human heart” (Ecclesiastes 3:11). In our hearts God has placed a sense of the eternal, and that sense of eternity connects with our hunger to endure and to leave something that endures after we die.

This hunger to leave a legacy is a gift from God, but it can be bent toward wrong ends. We all know the stories of someone who seems fixated on being important, being remembered, or being praised after death. Ironically, this prideful fixation on being remembered often makes a person sadly forgettable or humorously entertaining. The heart that is rightly ordered with God allows God to build His own legacy in our lives for His glory. As the Psalmist writes: “we will tell the next generation the praiseworthy deeds of the Lord, his power, and the wonders he has done” (Psalm 78:4).

In this week’s devotional we will explore how to leave a legacy in our lives that is neither prideful nor laughable, but honoring to God and His ways.

RESPOND THIS WEEK:
Each week’s practice will feature some aspect of the process Paul describes for us in Ephesians 4:22-24, where we are to TAKE OFF something from our lives that has become corrupted or distracting and PUT ON in its place something God wants us to do.

Take Off:Fast from social media, or some other place where you seek recognition from others, during this week. Choose not to post to your social media accounts this week or check your feeds.

Put On: Replace your time spent on social media with time listening to God. Ask Him to point out someone you can serve in secret this week. Plan a way to bless them in some tangible way.

[This a devotional I wrote with Jim Caler as part of the Eastbrook Church Lenten devotional, “Hungry for God.”]

The Hunger for Peace [Hungry for God]

During Lent at Eastbrook Church, we continue to explore the soul-deep hungers in our lives planted there by God in order to lead us to Himself. The series, “Hungry for God,” parallels the season of Lent, and has a companion daily devotional that you can access here.

This weekend I explored the hunger for peace. There were so many ways we could approach this topic. In fact just a short while ago, I preached on Jesus as the Prince of Peace. However, this weekend, I decided to focus in on Jesus’ Passion and the journey from the triumphal entry to the cross and beyond to the resurrection. I asked: how does Jesus’ Passion related to the peace He promised to bring?

You can view the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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Hungry for Peace

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No one wants to live feeling depleted and empty. We all want to live out of a place of abundance, satisfaction, and peace. We hunger to feel like our lives are on the right track and that everything is ‘right,’ in the best sense of the word. The biblical word for this is peace or, in Hebrew, shalom. Shalom means more than simply lack of conflict. Instead, it conveys a sense of completeness, success, welfare, and peace. A short definition for shalom is that all things are right in God’s world as they are supposed to be.

When Jesus begins His public ministry, he enters into an episode that would not be described as peaceful. Shortly after His baptism by John, “Jesus, full of the Holy Spirit, left the Jordan and was led by the Spirit into the wilderness, where for forty days he was tempted by the devil. He ate nothing during those days, and at the end of them he was hungry” (Luke 4:1-2). This temptation is a power encounter between the prince of this world, the devil, and the Prince of Peace, Jesus the Messiah. From start to finish, the three temptations of the devil are classic temptations of humanity, described by Henri Nouwen as the temptation to be relevant, popular, or powerful. Hungry and tired, Jesus experiences all the raging temptations of a peace-less world thrown at Him.

Jesus overcomes the temptations of the devil, however, and we realize that He is a new sort of king with a new sort of kingdom that will move in ways different from the ways of this world. When Isaiah the prophet describes the Messiah as “the Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6), we know this is exactly what we need. We need true shalom in the midst of our hunger for peace because we cannot ultimately satisfy it ourselves. This realization does not come quickly. Sometimes we must intentionally step back from some things, even normal things like the eating of food, to realize exactly what is going on in our lives.

It is no wonder that immediately before ascending to the Father, some of Jesus’ final words to His disciples are: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid” (John 14:27). The Prince of Peace has come to bring us peace, and that is very good news for us.

RESPOND THIS WEEK:
Each week’s practice will feature some aspect of the process Paul describes for us in Ephesians 4:22-24, where we are to TAKE OFF something from our lives that has become corrupted or distracting and PUT ON in its place something God wants us to do.

Take Off: Fast from food (in some form), perhaps for one meal a day or for an entire day. If you are physically prevented from completely fasting due to some health concerns, consider if there is a particular food, drink or “treat” you can deny yourself this week. Use the space below to take note of your experience this week.

Put On:In the place of eating the food you are fasting from, take time with God in solitude and silence to experience the peace that God brings. Consider how He provides for you all you need. Use the space below to take note of your experience this week.

[This a devotional I wrote with Jim Caler as part of the Eastbrook Church Lenten devotional, “Hungry for God.”]