Bibliography for Ephesians series

 

Here is the resource bibliography to accompany the recent preaching series, “Ephesians: A Crash Course in Basic Christianity.” Although I utilized many books or resources for specific messages within this series, I did not include all of those in this bibliography. Instead, I limited it to books our preaching team utilized throughout the series. The books I found particularly helpful are marked with an asterisk.

Bibliography on the book of Ephesians:

* C. E. Arnold. “Ephesians, Letter to the.” In Dictionary of Paul and His Letters, edited by Gerald F. Hawthorne, Ralph P. Martin, and Daniel G. Reid, 238-249. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1993.

F. F. Bruce. The Epistles to the Colossians, to Philemon, and to the Ephesians. NICNT. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1984.

John Chrysostom. “Homilies on the Epistle of St. Paul to the Ephesians.” In Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers, edited by Philip Schaff, vol. 13, 49-172. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 2004.

LaMoine F. DeVries. Cities of the Biblical World. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1997.

*Harold W. Hoehner. Ephesians: An Exegetical Commentary. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2002.

William W. Klein. “Ephesians.” In Expositor’s Bible Commentary, rev., vol. 12, 19-173. Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2006.

Eugene Peterson.  Practice Resurrection: A Conversation on Growing Up in Christ. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2010.

* Andrew T. Lincoln. Ephesians. WBC. Dallas, TX: Word Books, 1990.

Handley C. G. Moule. Ephesian Studies. London: Hodder & Stoughton, 1900.

Klyne Snodgrass. Ephesians. NIVAC. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1996.

John R. W. Stott. The Message of Ephesians: God’s New Society. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 1979.

Bibliography for Daniel series

After many of my preaching series, I enjoy sharing a bibliography that I used to help prepare for that series. Sometimes they are wide-ranging, such as the series on the life of Joseph, while at other times they are more clearly bounded by one specific topic, such as the series on prayer.

Here is the resource bibliography that accompanies my recent preaching series, “Daniel: Apocalyptic Imagination and Exile Faith.” Although I utilized many books or resources for specific messages within this series, I did not include all of those in this bibliography. Instead, I limited it to books I utilized through the series. The books I found particularly helpful are marked with an asterisk.

Bibliography on the book of Daniel:

Joyce Baldwin. Daniel: An Introduction and Commentary. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1978. [This volume in The Tyndale Old Testament Commentary series was recently replaced with a new volume by Paul R. House, which was released this November. Baldwin’s commentary is still a wonderful resource.]

*John E. Goldingay. Daniel. WBC. Dallas, TX: Word Books, 1989.

*Sidney Greidanus. Preaching Christ from Daniel: Foundations for Expository Sermons. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2012.

James M. Hamilton, Jr. With the Clouds of Heaven: The Book of Daniel in Biblical Theology. NSBT. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2014.

*Tremper Longman III. Daniel. NIVAC. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1999.

Ernest C. Lucas. “Daniel.” In Zondervan Illustrated Bible Backgrounds Commentary, vol. 4. John H. Walton, gen. ed. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2009.

________. “Daniel.” In Dictionary of the Old Testament Prophets. Mark J. Boda & J. Gordon McConville, eds. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2012.

W. D. Tucker, Jr. “Daniel: History of Interpretation.” In Dictionary of the Old Testament Prophets. Mark J. Boda & J. Gordon McConville, eds. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2012.

Ronald S. Wallace. The Message of Daniel: The Lord is King. BST. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1984.

Something Old, Something New

I love to read.

That’s one of the main reasons that when my family wants to give me a gift, they immediately think of giving me books or money to buy books. Some of you have been in my office and are thinking: ‘you have too many books already!’

Regardless of the truth of that, I still love reading books, books, and more books.

Many times, my mind is captured by what’s new or fresh on the shelf. I love to read over the most recent offerings of contemporary authors like Tim Keller, Donald Miller or Andy Crouch. These, and others like them, speak the language of our day. They help me to grapple with the issues in our current milieu and engage with others in our current time. Many times, they challenge me to think freshly.

But I have also found the importance of reading authors outside of our current time period. This helps me to combat the contemporary fascination with what is new. Just as we always long for the newest gadget, we also tend to seek after the newest idea. Too often, we naively think that the new idea is better than the old idea.

C. S. Lewis once wrote:

It is a good rule, after reading a new book, never to allow yourself another new one till you have read an old one in between. If that is too much for you, you should at least read one old one to every three new ones.

So, based on that advice, I’ve been adding some old, dusty books to my reading list. Some of the authors’ names sound funny. I’m finding their ideas and way of speaking both harder to engage, more challenging to my worldview, and still very refreshing.

Not long ago, I was reading an anonymous letter from a 1st century disciple of Jesus to someone named Diognetus. The richness of thought that I found within these few pages overwhelmed me. (You can access this in the writings of the early church fathers found online at www.ccel.org/fathers2).

I thought to myself: ‘why have I never looked into these sorts of writings before?’ The answer is found in my contemporary snobbery. If the new is better, then the old is often viewed as unimportant. If the new is to be held up as ultimately worthy, then the old may be discarded as unworthy.

So, I ask all of us this question: are we snobs of the contemporary, or are we letting the voices of the past speak depth into our lives?