Faith-full Public Engagement

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we concluded our series, “The Kingdom of God.” This week’s message specifically addressed the intersection of Christian discipleship and the public square, with attention to the topic of faith and politics.

You can view the message video and outline for the message is below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn.” (Isaiah 60:3)

Two Insufficient Ideas about Political Engagement

  • “Faith has no place in politics!”
  • “Politics has no place in faith!”
  • Our faith in Jesus Christ has political implications.

Four Theological Truths that Should Shape Our Political Engagement

  • Creation calling: Human beings are called by God to exercise dominion over the earth (Genesis 1:26-28)
  • Sin’s complication: Sin and the fall from grace has impacted every aspect of society (Romans 8:20)
  • Jesus is Lord: everything is subject to Him, and we will reign with Him (Philippians 2:10-11; 2 Timothy 2:11-12)
  • Love and truth: God’s kingdom agenda must guide us (John 3:16; 1:14)

Six Questions for Faith-full Political Engagement

  • Am I living out of a growing life with God that brings the fruit of the Spirit into my politics?
  • Have I taken steps to be informed on the issues at hand or am I taking action out of lack of knowledge?
  • Am I approaching this issue rooted in my kingdom citizenship and the agenda of God’s kingdom or from my earthly citizenship and political agenda alone?
  • How will my activity cultivate love for my neighbor and promote love, justice, truth, and moral order as God defines it?
  • How will my action serve the common good, not just for me and people like me but for all people?

How will my action promote the glory of God and the kingship of Christ both in the church and the broader world?


Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the theme of the kingdom of God in one or more of the following ways:

Vincent Bacote on “The Political Disciple: A Theology of Public Life”

In case you missed it, here is the video from last night’s Leadership Community event at Eastbrook on the intersection of discipleship and politics with Dr. Vincent Bacote. Vince joined us for this session to augment our current preaching series on the kingdom of God, offering theological perspectives on our public engagement as Christians.

Dr. Vincent Bacote is an Associate Professor of Theology and the Director of the Center for Applied Christian Ethics at Wheaton College in Wheaton, IL. He is the author of the The Political Disciple: A Theology of Public Life (2015), The Spirit in Public Theology: Appropriating the Legacy of Abraham Kuyper (2005), and has contributed to numerous other books. He serves as a theological editor for Christianity Today wth the “Race Set Before Us” series and has contributed to other magazines and journals, such as Comment MagazineBooks and CultureChristianity TodayThink Christianre:generation quarterly, Christian Scholars ReviewUrban Mission and the Journal for Christian Theological Research. He is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society and the Society of Christian Ethics. Learn more about Dr. Bacote on his website, vincentbacote.com.

Stoking the Fire of Our Passion for God

There are times when we falter in our pursuit of God. The wind and rain of life’s pressure comes against us to put out the fire of our passion for the Lord.

Jesus’ parable of the seed and the soils is fitting for times like that. In that parable Jesus describes how we receive God’s word into our life similarly to how different soil types receive seeds. Different types of soil bring about varying types of fruitfulness. As with certain soils that choke out growth, the stress, fear, and confusion of daily life may crowd out the possibility of fruitfulness for God’s kingdom in our lives.  We decrease in passion for Him and, as a result, we lose our fruitfulness in Him.

Paul wrote to the church in Thessalonica: “Do not put out the Spirit’s fire” (1 Thessalonians 5:19). The Apostle was urging this young church to continually stoke the fires of their passion for God.Read More »

Patience and Personal Discipleship

Good things come to those who wait, I’ve been told, but, honestly, I have a really hard time with that.

Let me give you three situations many of us face. Number one: music tries to calm me down as I anxiously wait behind unending lines of traffic, hoping I arrive reasonably on-time to my next appointment. Number two: I carefully choose which check-out line at the store I will head to with my items. I evaluate whether it might make the most sense to go for self-check-out and skip dealing with people altogether. Number three: I head to the DMV, knowing that the actual business I have there does not necessarily need to take more than a few moments but anticipating the reality that I will wait agonizingly long to simply get this taken care of.

“Good things come to those who wait,” but wouldn’t we all prefer to have good things come precisely when we want them? I know that we have heard patience is a virtue, but deep down we all want instant gratification. Now, more than ever, the possibility of instant gratification is within reach as technology married with enterprise has brought us the possibility of getting what we want immediately while never leaving the comfort of our homes. Don’t misunderstand me, I am as prone to enjoy Netflix and Amazon Prime as the next person, but our culture of instant gratification is doing something to us that is not nearly all helpful. The eight-second attention span[1] and inability to delay gratification are making us more anxious and impatient,[2] affecting more than our pace of life and consumption of goods. Now we say, “good things come to those who wait…but let my waiting be short (e.g., eight seconds for information, sixty seconds for music and movie downloads, and twenty-four hours for my online shopping)!”

This anxious impatience is eroding our spiritual lives as well. Spiritual transformation only comes via “a long obedience in the right direction.”[3] Paul the Apostle describes our growth as Christians as a process of growth and maturing, moving from spiritual infancy to nature adulthood, “so that the body of Christ may be built up…and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ” (Ephesians 4:12-13). We understand this physically, expecting babies to grow to toddlers and on to teenagers before becoming adults. Yet, somehow, we forget that this same process of growth applies to the spiritual life of discipleship. It is not something that comes quickly, but must go through a similar process of growth and maturing over time. Spiritual growth does not happen overnight, let alone in sixty seconds, but must happen over a lifetime.

There is no more valuable, nor more difficult, character trait necessary in the Christian life in this regard than patience.  The Scripture shows both that patience is invaluable in our own lives (Proverbs 19:11; Ecclesiastes 7:8; James 5:7) and in our relationships with others (Colossians 3:12; 2 Timothy 3:10). Our discipleship, as a matter of fact, is a growth in which God shows forth His patience with us from start to finish (Romans 2:4; 1 Timothy 1:16). If we want to grow with God, following Jesus as our Leader and Savior, then we must commit to the patient journey of discipleship over the long haul.

Within the Bible, one of the clearest pictures of this is seen in the Psalms of Ascent. This little collection of psalms was utilized for prayer and worship on the pilgrimage to Jerusalem. Groups of believers would journey together, caring for one another and building one another up, as they prepared to meet with God and His people in worship. The pilgrimage journey of the Psalms of Ascent provides us with a soundtrack for the patient journey of discipleship. We need songs in our mouths and hearts, we need others to journey with, and we need lives that move steadily closer to God. 

This patient journey of discipleship, and the place that patience begins to have in our lives, is often seen as a key to seeing change in the life of others (Proverbs 25:15; 2 Timothy 4:2). In a culture of anxious impatience where many have misplaced hopes of relief, a patient, peaceful community of people living daily life with God speaks louder than all sorts of religious activity.

Maybe now is a time to disconnect from the impatient pulse of a technologized angst in order to reconnect with the patient journey of discipleship with God. Our very lives, both in word and in deed, may become a living witness to an eternal God who is unhurried in His life and purposes.


[1] Timothy Egan, “The Eight-Second Attention Span,” New York Times, January 22, 2016, https://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/22/opinion/the-eight-second-attention-span.html.

[2] Emma Taubenfeld, “The Culture of Impatience and Instant Gratificaiton,” Study Breaks, March 23, 2017, https://studybreaks.com/2017/03/23/instant-gratification/.

[3] With a nod to both Eugene Peterson and Friedrich Nietszche.

[This post originally appeared as part of the Gospel in Life blog.]

Comprehensive Praise: some reflections on worship from Psalm 150

sunshine-dust-motesThe psalms are the prayerbook of the Bible, prayer-songs that were often used within the corporate and private worship of the people of Israel. They are also one of our strongest biblical resources for shaping our life of worship today within the Christian church. The entire psalter concludes with a summary psalm of worship, Psalm 150, and I would like to share some thoughts that leap out to me about worship from this psalm.

Worship is God-Centered
The beginning word of Psalm 150 is simple: Hallelujah, which means, “praise the Lord.” The theme and tone of this psalm, something which sums up the entire book of psalms, is God-directed praise. This word, hallelujah, sets our spiritual compass to true north in God. Here at the beginning of this psalm, yet at the end of the entire psalter, we remember that God is the center-point of attention for our worship and rooted anchor for our lives. An oft-repeated phrase about worship is: “its’ not about me.” Hallelujah is the personal and communal exclamation of that reality. When we conclude the final word in the psalms with an introductory word, “praise the Lord,” we are forced to remember that worship and life is not about me but about God.

The Intersection of the Mundane and the Holy
In the next verses of Psalm 150, we find location in worship within God’s sanctuary or tabernacle even as our imagination stretches up to the heavens or the firmament of the sky. The psalmist reminds us that worship simultaneously draws us near to God in a Read More »