Refugee Messiah

This past weekend we continued our series “Power in Preparation” at Eastbrook Church. This is the second part of our extended journey through the Gospel of Matthew. This week’s message looks at Matthew 2:13-23 and Jesus as the refugee Messiah.

You can view the message video and outline below. The video begins with a time of prayer for our nation that you can see the written form of here. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“So he got up, took the child and his mother during the night and left for Egypt, where he stayed until the death of Herod. And so was fulfilled what the Lord had said through the prophet: ‘Out of Egypt I called my son.’” (Matthew 2:14-15)

Seeking Refuge in Egypt (Matthew 2:13-18)

  • Another dream for Joseph
  • Jesus flees south to Egypt
  • Scripture fulfilled: Hosea 11:1
  • Scripture fulfilled: Jeremiah 31:15

Returning Home (Matthew 2:19-21)

  • Another dream for Joseph
  • Jesus returns to the Land of Promise

Seeking Refuge in Galilee (Matthew 2:22-23)

  • Another dream for Joseph
  • Jesus flees north to Galilee, specifically, Nazareth
  • Scripture fulfilled: Isaiah 11:1/Judges 16:17

Jesus the Refugee Messiah

  • Jesus the new King (Bethlehem – Son of David)
  • Jesus the new Exodus (Egypt – Moses)
  • Jesus the new return (Ramah – Exile)
  • Jesus the unexpected, expected One – “he had no beauty or majesty to attract us to him” (Isaiah 53:2)

Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the contrast between Jesus and Herod in one or more of the following ways:

This week dig deeper into the contrast between Jesus and Herod in one or more of the following ways:

  • Set aside some time this week to read Matthew 2:13-23 again. Then write, draw, paint, or pray aloud your own response to this series of events in Jesus’ life.
  • Read Matthew 2 in light of Moses’ life by comparing it to Exodus 1-4.
  • Look at a map of Jesus’ journey with his family to Egypt and back again here
  • Consider watching the BibleProject video, “Messiah

Joseph

This past weekend we continued our series “Family Tree” at Eastbrook Church. This is the third week in the first part of our extended journey through the Gospel of Matthew (see previous weeks here and here). During Advent, we will focus on the genealogy of Jesus found in Matthew, chapters 1 and 2. This message explored the significance of Joseph as seen in Matthew 1:18-25.

You can view the message video and outline below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“An angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream and said, ‘Joseph son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary home as your wife, because what is conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit.’”  (Matthew 1:20)

Joseph the Upright (Matthew 1:18-19)

  • righteous – “faithful to the law”
  • merciful

Joseph the Dreamer (Matthew 1:20-23)

  • dreams of Joseph (1:20-21; 2:13; 2:19; 2:22)
  • Joseph listens to God

Joseph the Obedient (Matthew 1:24-25)

  • hearing the angelic message
  • responding directly to what was spoken (1:20 & 1:24; 2:13 & 2:14; 2:20 & 2:21)

Joseph the Adoptive Father (Matthew 1:25)

  • The importance of taking Mary home
  • The importance of naming Jesus
  • “The Son of David”

Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the life of Joseph from Matthew 1:18-25 in one or more of the following ways:

  • Memorize the angel’s  words to Joseph in Matthew 1:20-21
  • Consider reading about Joseph in all of the New Testament accounts of him:
    • Matthew 1:16, 18-25; 2:9-12, 13-23; 13:55
    • Mark 6:1-3
    • Luke 1:26-56; 2:1-52; 2:1-12; 3:23; 4:22
    • John 1:45; 6:41-42

Men of Faith and Exile

This past weekend we began a new series at Eastbrook Church entitled “Family Tree.” This is the first week in the first part of our extended journey through the Gospel of Matthew. During Advent, we will focus on the genealogy of Jesus found in Matthew, chapters 1 and 2. This message looks at Jesus’ connection with Abraham, David, and the exile.

You can view the message video and outline below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“This is the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah the son of David, the son of Abraham” (Matthew 1:1)

The Genealogy of Jesus

  • Matthew’s structure: 3 groupings of 14 generation
  • Differences between Matthew and Luke
  • Matthew’s goal in the genealogy: to show that Jesus is king of the Jews and hope of the nations

The Providence of God in History

  • “The son of Abraham” (1:1-2; Genesis 12:1-3)
  • “The son of David” (1:1, 6; 2 Samuel 7:12-13)
  • “After the exile” (1:11-12)

Seeing God’s Purpose in Jesus’ Genealogy

  • Jesus is the fulfillment of God’s promise to the nations
  • Jesus is the new King and Messiah for a conflicted world
  • Jesus is the providential hope for humanity lost in exile

Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into Matthew 1:1-17 in one or more of the following ways:

  • Consider reading some of the backstory of figures mentioned in Jesus’ genealogy, such as:
    • Abraham (Genesis 11:27-23:20; 25:1-11)
    • Jacob (Genesis 25:19-34; 27:1-35:29)
    • David (1 Samuel 15:1-2 Samuel 8:18)
  • If you want to really dig deep into the Scripture around Jesus’ infancy and early years, read Raymond Brown’s in-depth book, The Birth of the Messiah.
  • Consider watching the Bible Project’s two videos summarizing the Gospel of Matthew and on exile.

A Pilgrim Prayer for Nomads

For he was looking forward to the city with foundations, whose architect and builder is God. (Hebrews 11:10)

Abraham the nomad for God and His purposes is also Abraham the pilgrim. At one level, Abraham and Sarah’s journey feels random and strange. They leave their homeland and their extended support network. They leave what is known for what is unknown. From the outside, it could seem that they are merely wandering nomads.

But the eyes of faith see something else. Abraham and Sarah hear God and respond. They live each day, aware of God’s guiding hand and watchful for God’s interrupting grace that will point them toward what is next. Abraham and Sarah wait. They step forward and step back They works and rest. They succeed and they fail. They travel and they are still. And all of this happens in relation to the leading of God. This is the blessed way of those, as Psalm 84:5 says, “whose hearts are set on pilgrimage.”

Lord, lead me into the pilgrim way of faith seen in Abraham and Sarah. Though my ways sometimes feel more like nomadic wanderings than anything else, help me to discern Your hand in the midst of my day. And so, Lord, give me Your vision and guide me into Your purposes for my life that I every day and hour might draw me closer to You than to anything or anyone else. Open my ears to hear and my eyes to see. Strengthen my mind to understand and my heart to yearn for You. In this earthly way be my eternal home both for now and always.

The Kingdom of God and the Kingdoms of This World

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we continued our series, “The Kingdom of God” by exploring the ways in which our citizenship in the kingdom interfaces with our earthly citizenship. I proposed that we need to live by the power of the Holy Spirit as exiles in and for the world, concluding with five practices that may help us live this out.

You can view the message video and outline for the message is below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“If you declare with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.” (Romans 10:9)

“Jesus is Lord!”

  • The closeness of the kingdom and responding to Jesus (Mark 1:15)
  • The fundamental declaration of faith (Romans 10:9)
  • Everything is subject to Christ and God’s kingdom (Philippians 2:10-11)

Kingdom Citizens: Recognizing our Dual Citizenship

  • We are citizens of God’s kingdom (Philippians 3:20)
  • We are citizens of earthly kingdoms

Living by the Spirit as Exiles in the World

  • Remember God’s kingdom is a different sort of kingdom (John 18:33-36)
  • Remember we are a holy nation established by God in Christ (1 Peter 2:9-10)
  • Remembering we are exiles scattered in the world (1 Peter 1:1-2; 2:11-12)
  • Remember God has delegated authority to earthly rulers and kingdoms (John 19:10-11; Romans 13:1-2)

Living by the Spirit as Exiles for the World

  • Living as exiles for the blessing of the places we are scattered by God (Jeremiah 29:4-7)
  • Living as good citizens within the structures as established by God (Romans 13:1-7)
  • Living in Christian service in relation to the needs of the world (Matthew 25:31-46)
  • Living prophetically in relation to the powers and authorities (Acts 4:8-20)

Five Practices of Kingdom Citizens amidst Earthly Kingdoms

  • Hold to our primary citizenship
  • Discern the times and agendas
  • Walk by the Spirit
  • Maintain perspective
  • Live in the tension of hope

Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the theme of the kingdom of God in one or more of the following ways:

  • Memorize Romans 10:9 or Philippians 3:20.
  • Take time to meditate on Jesus’ encounter with Pontius Pilate in John 18:33-36; 19:10-11. Respond to the passage by drawing, painting, journaling, or going for a walk to pray.
  • Based on this message and study guide, talk with a friend or journal on your own about what it means to live in the tension of hope as a citizen of the kingdom of God and a citizen of an earthly kingdom.
  • Join us for the Leadership Community with Dr. Vince Bacote on Monday, September 28, at 7 PM, as he speaks on “The Political Disciple: A Theology of Public Life.”