Jesus the New Israel

Jesus Tempted in the Wilderness, James Tissot, Brooklyn Museum

As part of my message this past weekend on Daniel 12, “Faith at the End of All Things,” I shared a list of parallels about how Jesus is not only Savior and Forgiver, but also takes all the history of Israel into Himself and becomes the new Israel as the Messiah. A number of people asked if I would share that list, and so I’m doing that here.

A Messiah will come and bring hope and life for humanity. He will be like the Son of Man figure in Daniel 7, worthy of worship and like God. But he will also take all the history of Israel into himself and bring its fulfillment through His life death and resurrection. And so:

  • Jesus’ humble birth at the edges of civilization parallels Israel’s humble beginnings as a nomadic tribe of Abraham.
  • Jesus’ baptism parallels Israel’s crossing of the Red Sea after the Exodus
  • Jesus’ testing in the desert for 40 days parallels Israel’s wandering in the wilderness for 40 years
  • Jesus’ teaching and miracles as God’s tabernacle in flesh parallels the building of the tabernacle and temple where heaven touched earth in God’s presence
  • Jesus’ death on the Cross parallels the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple, and the overrunning of God’s people
  • Jesus’ burial in the tomb parallels the exile of God’s people from the Promised Land
  • Jesus’ resurrection in the tomb parallels the double exodus of liberation from slavery in Egypt and liberation from exile in Babylon
  • And Jesus ascension to the Father’s right hand parallels the future resurrection that awaits humanity at the end of our lives and the cataclysmic end of human history at Christ’s return

This is why, with Peter, we can celebrate Jesus as not only our Forgiver and Savior, but the resurrected bringer of hope with God for humanity.

“Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ! In his great mercy he has given us new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead” (1 Peter 1:3).

Faith at the End of All Things [Daniel 12]

I concluded our series on the book of Daniel last weekend at Eastbrook Church by focusing on the final words of the book found in Daniel 12:5-13. This concludes the final vision of Daniel, which is also the longest vision, stretching from 10:1-12:13. This message brings together themes of persevering in our faith and the hope of the resurrection.

You can view the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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Summary Chart on Daniel’s visions

Daniel Series GFX_App WideIn my message this past weekend at Eastbrook Church from Daniel 10:1-12:4, “Faith and the Final Vision,” I shared a chart that I adapted from Sidney Greidanus‘ book Preaching Christ from Daniel. I want to thank Pete Briscoe for recommending the book to me because it has been an invaluable resource, along with many other resources, as I’ve preached through Daniel over the past months. You can download the chart as a PDF in landscape formatting here. However, I’m also inserting it into this blog post in portrait orientation below.

Daniel 2 Daniel 7 Daniel 8 Daniel 10-12 Kingdom Dates
Head of gold Lion with eagles’ wings     Babylon 605-539 BC
Chest and arms of silver Bear with one side higher than the other Ram with 2 horns, 1 longer King Cyrus (10:1)

Three kings (11:2a)

Fourth king (11:2b)

Medo-Persia 539-331 BC
Belly and thighs of bronze Leopard with 4 wings, 4 heads Fast goat with 4 horns Warrior king (11:3)

Kingdom divided to four winds (11:4)

Alexander (Greece)

 

4 generals

 

331-323 BC

 

Kings of south (11:5-20)

Kings of north (11:6-20)

Ptolemies

Seleucids

323-63 BC
Contemptible one (11:21-35) Antiochus IV 175-164 BC
Legs of iron

Feet & toes of iron and clay

Monster with iron teeth, 10 horns     Rome 63 BC-AD 476
10 kings Present period
Stone smashes statue God burns the monster Little horn destroyed The king (11:36-45)

King destroyed (11:45)

Time of anguish (12:1)

Antichrist Final days
Mountain fills the whole earth Kingdom given to son of man and God’s people   God’s people delivered (12:1)

Resurrection (12:2; 12:13)

The wise exalted

Kingdom of God Everlasting
From Sidney Greidanus, Preaching Christ from Daniel (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2012), 344.

Faith and the Final Vision [Daniel 10-11]

I continued our series on the book of Daniel this past weekend at Eastbrook Church by exploring the final vision Daniel has in the book, found in Daniel 10:1-12:4. In order to walk through this entire passage in one message, I had to pick and choose certain things to focus on, and I chose to give attention to the spiritual conflict that permeates all human conflict upon earth.

Four action steps I offered, which are not included in the outline below are:

  • Seelet God unveil our eyes to have a vision of the spiritual conflict around us
  • Run – knowing our inability and weakness, let us run to God for deliverance, and ultimately to Jesus as our Savior
  • Stand – as trials and difficulties arise, let us learn from the Apostle Paul’s words in Ephesians 6:10-17 to stand form in God’s strength and armor
  • Pray – only in God’s presence and power will we endure, so may we pray our hearts out in the midst of the conflict

Late in the message, during the point about running to God, I shared a quote by H. C. G. Moule from his Ephesians Studies, which I’m sharing here:

If these revelations of an invisible host around us, bent upon our calamity, do nothing else for us, they may at least render the inestimable service of driving us home, as for our very life, to personal dealings with our Personal Deliverer. He can indeed face for us the dreadful personalities marshaled in the Shadows that surround our life.

You can view the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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Exile Faith at Prayer [Daniel 9]

We continued our series on the book of Daniel this past weekend at Eastbrook Church by turning to Daniel’s famous prayer in chapter 9. Daniel’s prayer takes place in the first year of Cyrus’ reign, around 539 BC, and references Jeremiah 25:10-11 in recognizing that the time of the exile is reaching its conclusion. Daniel has been in exile for more than 60 years, but his imagination has not been closed in by the suffering of exile. Instead his prayer takes flight through an imagination set fire by the revelations of God.

You can view the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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3 Reasons Daniel’s Visions Matter

image 1 - looking forward.pngAs we have been journeying through a preaching series on the book of Daniel at Eastbrook Church, “Daniel: Apocalyptic Imagination and Exile Faith,” we have come to some of the most difficult parts of the book to understand in the visions of chapters 7-12. Through these visions, God unveils the reality of what is really going on in the midst of the ordinary history of earth. God is writing a story, even in the midst of the beasts of earth.

Amongst all of this, we might wonder why God gave Daniel these visions, and what their significance is for Daniel and the other exiles of Judah. Let me share three reasons God gives Daniel these visions and why they matter:

  1. God grants Daniel these visions so that he and the rest of God’s exiled people will be prepared for what is to come. Empires will rise and kingdoms will fall. Kings will rise and kings will fall. The exiled people will ride the waves of this history and it is God’s grace that gives insight into these shifting waves so that the people can be prepared to ride the currents of these waves.
  2. God also gives Daniel these visions so that the people of God might be encouraged by the reality that God is in charge of human history and there will be an end to suffering and oppression. Many times throughout the second half of the book of Daniel, we hear that God will bring an end to the kingdoms of earth, eventually bringing the fullness of God’s kingdom upon earth. God knows how hard it is to stay encouraged in difficult times, and so God graciously encourages them with the reality that there will be an end.
  3. God, thirdly, gives these visions to Daniel so that the people of God might be watchful for not only what is happening in human history, but for how God is at work in the midst of human history. God knows how easily we as human lose our perspective and stop watching for Him, and it is God’s grace through these apocalyptic visions to startle His people to attentiveness.

Faith Looking Forward [Daniel 8]

After a weekend off due to sickness (thank you, Pastor Jim Caler, for covering for me last weekend!), I continued our series on the book of Daniel this past weekend at Eastbrook Church by turning to chapter 8, the second of Daniel’s apocalyptic visions.

Daniel 8 continues the apocalyptic visions of the second half of the book. As with my message on Daniel 7, “Faith in God Amidst the Beasts,” this message, “Faith Looking Forward,” engages our imagination through God’s inspired symbols and images of what is really going on in the midst of human history. Daniel has this vision during the third year of the reign of Belshazzar, the last of the Babylonian kings represented in Daniel, and thus it takes place chronologically before Daniel 5 and 6. We are introduced to figures that stand against God which both reflect the antichrist spirit and the future Antichrist figure that is to come.

You can view the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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