A Prayer inspired by Hebrews 4:14-5:10

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Throughout our new series “The Final Word: Knowing Christ through Hebrews,” I am writing prayers related to the text on which we are preaching each week. This prayer is drawn from Hebrews 4:14-5:10. The complete list of prayers inspired by Hebrews is included at the bottom of this post. You can also view my message, “Jesus the High Priest,” from this passage here.

Father, we know that we were made for You,
that our souls will only find true peace and joy
when we are in reconciled relationship with You
both for now and for eternity.

We confess, O God, that we are lost without You.
Our minds are confused with various messages,
Our hearts are stirred by diverse desires,
and our very being is trapped in cycles of sin and brokenness.

Jesus, only Son of the Father,
You alone are our Great High Priest,
who makes a way for us to boldly approach
God’s throne of grace for the help we need.

Holy Spirit, we invite You to set us ablaze again
with the Pentecost fire of Your indwelling presence
that we might once again burn for Your glory
as a shining light in this world.

All this we pray in Your name, Triune God—
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—
the One we need more than anything or anyone else
and also the One who provides for our greatest need.
Amen.


Prayers from Hebrews:

Eastbrook at Home – May 31, 2020

Eastbrook-At-Home-Series-GFX_16x9-Title

Join us for worship with Eastbrook Church through Eastbrook at Home as we celebrate Pentecost Sunday and continue our series “The Final Word: Knowing Christ through Hebrews.” This weekend I will preach from Hebrews 4:14-5:10 and what it means that Jesus is the great high priest. Follow along with the entire series here. Access the downloadable bulletin, sermon notes, and sermon discussion guide here.

Don’t miss the chance to join in with a virtual small group discussing the sermon every Sunday at 11 AM. More info here.

Each Sunday beginning at 8 AM, you can participate with our weekly worship service at home with your small group, family, or friends. This service will then be available during the week until the next Sunday’s service starts.

As we continue to tweak this experience, please let us know your experience by emailing us here. You can also access or download the service directly via Vimeo or the Eastbrook app.

If you are not signed up for our church emailing list, please sign up here. Also, please remember that during this time financial support for the church is critical as we continue minister within our congregation and reach out to our neighborhood, city, and the world at this challenging time. Please give online or send in a donation to support the ministry of Eastbrook Church.

A Prayer inspired by Hebrews 4:1-13

image 3 - Hebrews

Throughout our new series “The Final Word: Knowing Christ through Hebrews,” I am writing prayers related to the text on which we are preaching each week. This prayer is drawn from Hebrews 4:1-13. The complete list of prayers inspired by Hebrews is included at the bottom of this post. You could also view a message, “Finding Rest in God,” by Amanda Kilponen from this passage here.

Lord, our current time is a time of weariness;
of endless reports of trauma, change, and death.
Worn out by such words, we confess that we need
a good word of great joy for all people this day.

Today, Lord, we turn to You to find true rest.
We admit that many places we look for rest
do not really provide what they promise to offer.
And so, Lord, we look to You for sabbath and peace.

Lord, we thank You that You are true to Your promises
and that the promise of rest is still open to us today.
We draw near in full humility before our need
but also in full confidence of Your provision.

Today, Lord, strengthen us to diligently obey You
that, walking in Your will and your way,
we might truly enter into the rest You provide
both for now and unto eternity.

All this we pray in Your name, Triune God—
Father, Son, and Holy Spirit—
You who are truly at work and simultaneously at rest,
to whom be all honor and glory, now and forever.
Amen.


Prayers from Hebrews:

Eastbrook at Home – May 24, 2020

Eastbrook-At-Home-Series-GFX_16x9-Title

Join us for worship with Eastbrook Church through Eastbrook at Home as we continue our series “The Final Word: Knowing Christ through Hebrews.” This weekend we look at Hebrews 4 and what it means to enter into the rest of God.

Join in with a virtual small group on the sermon every Sunday at 11 AM. More info here.

Each Sunday beginning at 8 AM, you can participate with our weekly worship service at home with your small group, family, or friends. This service will then be available during the week until the next Sunday’s service starts.

As we continue to tweak this experience, please let us know your experience by emailing us here. You can also access or download the service directly via Vimeo or the Eastbrook app.

If you are not signed up for our church emailing list, please sign up here. Also, please remember that during this time financial support for the church is critical as we continue minister within our congregation and reach out to our neighborhood, city, and the world at this challenging time. Please give online or send in a donation to support the ministry of Eastbrook Church.

Comprehensive Praise: some reflections on worship from Psalm 150

sunshine-dust-motesThe psalms are the prayerbook of the Bible, prayer-songs that were often used within the corporate and private worship of the people of Israel. They are also one of our strongest biblical resources for shaping our life of worship today within the Christian church. The entire psalter concludes with a summary psalm of worship, Psalm 150, and I would like to share some thoughts that leap out to me about worship from this psalm.

Worship is God-Centered
The beginning word of Psalm 150 is simple: Hallelujah, which means, “praise the Lord.” The theme and tone of this psalm, something which sums up the entire book of psalms, is God-directed praise. This word, hallelujah, sets our spiritual compass to true north in God. Here at the beginning of this psalm, yet at the end of the entire psalter, we remember that God is the center-point of attention for our worship and rooted anchor for our lives. An oft-repeated phrase about worship is: “its’ not about me.” Hallelujah is the personal and communal exclamation of that reality. When we conclude the final word in the psalms with an introductory word, “praise the Lord,” we are forced to remember that worship and life is not about me but about God.

The Intersection of the Mundane and the Holy
In the next verses of Psalm 150, we find location in worship within God’s sanctuary or tabernacle even as our imagination stretches up to the heavens or the firmament of the sky. The psalmist reminds us that worship simultaneously draws us near to God in a Read More »