What Happens When People Do Not Have Hope?

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What happens when people do not have hope?

What happens when a young man or young woman looks to the future and the lack of hope has dimmed all brightness in those days to come?

What happens when people do not have hope?

What happens when an older woman or an older man looks to their final days and feels the emptiness of hopeless hours stretching on to the end of their life?

What happens when people do not have hope?

What happens when a person of one skin color looks at the life of a person with another skin color, notes the inseparable distance, and feels hope crash in the difficult journey to justice?

What happens when people do not have hope?

What happens when a person flees their homeland marked by violence or lack of opportunity for a new land in hope of finding something different but quickly discovers not only that there are no streets of gold but that they are viewed forever as an outsider who does not belong?

What happens when people do not have hope?

I cannot help but think of Langston Hughes poem, “Harlem,” on this very subject, which says:

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?
Or fester like a sore—
And then run?
Does it stink like rotten meat?
Or crust and sugar over—
like a syrupy sweet?

Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

When hope dies, a life might dry up or fester. Life might seem to stink or grow hard and crust over. Life without hope might sag or it might explode.

image 1 - COVID-19

We’re in a crisis of hope right now in our world and nation. That crisis of hope was precipitated by a pandemic that brought us face to face with our mortality, our limits, our fears, and our inability to work together. It raised questions about our health and our finances, our present and our future, our living and our dying. In this pandemic, we may feel fear, anger, anxiety, or frustration rise up within us. And it puts to the test our ability to hope as we ask: “when or how will this situation change?”

image 2 - I can't breath

That crisis of hope in our world continues into the present moment of the surging pain related to racial justice. Seeing the death of George Floyd put in stark terms the series of deaths that we cannot ignore and bursting forth around our nation and around our world was another crisis of hope that brought us face to face with questions about identity, skin color, and the vast, painful difference between reality and the aspirations of “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” As people hit the streets around the world, it pushes us into a crisis of hope where we may wonder: “will anything change?”

Living without hope is nearly impossible.

But when hope exists, everything changes.

What happens when people have hope?

Young women and men step forward toward brighter days.

Older men and women feel that even the diminishment of life is not empty but can be abundant.

What happens when people have hope?

People of many backgrounds – many skin colors and many countries of origin – can stand together and work together toward a powerful just and righteous future.

Hope is powerful.

It is, as Emily Dickinson wrote,

..the thing with feathers –
That perches in the soul –
And sings the tune without the words –
And never stops – at all

Hope is that characteristic of our lives with two parts:

  1. The longing for something that is not present
  2. The expectation that one will receive it

Now, the Christian life is, if anything, a life fixed upon hope. We hear in God’s word His promises and we believe that we will receive what God promises. This shapes our understanding of salvation; our belief that God has done something in Christ that we can receive from God now and hope for unto eternity. In the Christian life we are pilgrims on the way with God and this is fueled by hope. As we read in 2 Peter 1:4

Through these he has given us his very great and precious promises, so that through them you may participate in the divine nature, having escaped the corruption in the world caused by evil desires. (2 Peter 1:4)

At a practical level, prayer is guided by hope. We reach out to God, trusting He will hear us and will give us what we most need, if not what we always ask for. Without hope we could not pray.

Without hope, we are lost. But with hope, we have a future.

[This is an excerpt from my message, “Anchored in Hope,” from June 14, 2020, at Eastbrook Church.]

Witnesses to Hope

Over the past couple of years, I have participated in the Gospel Life blog hosted by the Billy Graham Center for Evangelism at Wheaton College.

In my post there today I write about the need for us as Christians to become witnesses to hope. This post came out of a lot of my own conversations and reflections upon the present moment in our world and what it looks like to be a voice and presence of hope in the time in which we live. As hopelessness rises up, we must also rise up with hopefulness.

This past year has brought wave after wave of discouraging news. Many people I encounter feel overwhelmed by increasing political incoherence, racial injustice, and global chaos, not to mention their own personal challenges. Despair rises up around us like hunger in the stomach of a famine-wracked child. If I could pick one word to encapsulate the current tone of our society it would be hopelessness.

As followers of Jesus we are called to be people of hope, and this calling is even more important in light of the entangling hopelessness of our day. In fact, our witness as Christians at this present hour will remain inadequate if we do not recapture the hope inherent in the gospel…

[Continue reading the article here.]

Peace

We began our journey with the Psalms of Ascent, “Ascend,” this weekend at Eastbrook, spending time with Psalm 120. In this message, I explore themes of the spiritual life with God as a pilgrimage or journey, honesty and hopeful prayer, the need for community, and living in peace instead of hatred or hopelessness.

Here is the video and sermon outline of this first message of the Ascend series, “Peace.” You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast. We also have a reading plan for this series, which you can access here.

 

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