Transfigured (discussion questions)

jesus-on-the-move-series-gfx_app-squareHere are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Transfigured,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This is part of our series, “Jesus on the Move.” The text for this week are from Luke 9:28-36.

Discussion Questions:

  1. When have you experienced real jaw-dropping awe in your life? What happened or where were you?
  2. We continue the series “Jesus on the Move” this week by looking at Luke 9:28-36. Before you begin this study, ask God to speak to you from His Word, and then read the text aloud.
  3. This story occurs after many miracles, as well as Peter’s declaration that Jesus is God’s Messiah (9:20) and Jesus’ prediction of His death and resurrection (9:21-27). Like many other pivotal events, this episode arises in the context of prayer. Why do you think that is important?
  4. Jesus’ physical transformation seems to be a ‘sneak preview’ of the glory of God found in Him. Moses and Elijah stand nearby and talk with Jesus. Read Deuteronomy 18:14-21 and Malachi 4:5-6. What would you say is the significance of Moses and Elijah’s presence here?
  5. Peter, John and James are startled to attention by this amazing sight. Peter wants to build booths, which may refer to the Jewish Feast of Tabernacles (Leviticus 23:33-44; Deuteronomy 16:13-17). Why do you think Peter says this?
  6. The appearance of a cloud over this glorious gathering is reminiscent of the glory of God covering His people in a cloud (Exodus 40:34-35; 2 Chronicles 5:13-14). What does the voice from the cloud tell us about who Jesus is; even who Jesus is compared to Moses and Elijah?
  7. Habakkuk 2:20 says, “The Lord is in his holy temple; let all the earth keep silence before him.” Take some time in stillness and silence to reflect on the glory of the Lord.
  8. What is one thing that God is speaking to you personally through this study? If you’re on your own, take some time to write it down and share it with someone later. If you are with a small group, share it with one another.

  


Daily Reading Plan

To encourage us together in our growth with God, we are arranging a weekday reading plan through this entire series with the Gospel of Luke. As you read each day, ask God to speak to you from His word.

Follow along with the reading plan below, through the Eastbrook app, or on social media.

Feb. 20           Luke 9:28-36
Feb. 21           Matthew 17:1-13; Matthew 3:1-3
Feb. 22           Isaiah 42:1-4; Matthew 3:16-17
Feb. 23           Mark 9:2-13
Feb. 24           Acts 2:22-23; Deuteronomy 18:15, 18

Transfigured

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This weekend at Eastbrook Church I continued our series, “Jesus on the Move,” with a messaged entitled, “Transfigured” from Luke 9:28-36. This event conveys both the beautiful and dangerous glory of Jesus’ true nature as fully God and fully man. The silence of the disciples at the end of it all echoes our own call to silence before the only awesome God in Jesus Christ. As the prophet Habakkuk writes:

The Lord is in His holy temple;
let all the earth keep silence before Him. (Habakkuk 2:20)

You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

Also, join in with the weekday reading plan for this series here.

The Glorious Unveiling (Luke 9:28-31)

Jesus’ glory

Jesus’ companions

Jesus’ exodus

 

The Glorious Overwhelming (Luke 9:32-33)

Shocked awake

Peter’s desire to build shelters

 

The Glorious Voice (Luke 9:34-35)

The cloud

The voice

 

The Glorious Silence (Luke 9:36; Habakkuk 2:20)

The awe-filled silence

The untold story

 

Messiah (discussion questions)

jesus-on-the-move-series-gfx_app-squareHere are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Messiah,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This is part of our series, “Jesus on the Move.” The text for this week are from Luke 9:18-21.

Discussion Questions:

  1. What do people in society at large or in your relational sphere say about Jesus?
  2. We continue the series “Jesus on the Move” this week by looking at three brief but incredibly important verses. Before you begin this study, ask God to speak to you from His Word, and then read Luke 9:18-20 aloud.
  3. Background: This brief passage is one of the most significant moments in Jesus’ self-revelation and the disciples’ grasp of His identity. It comes after much teaching (6:17-49), many miracles (8:22-56; 9:10-17) and the sending out of the Twelve apostles (9:1-6), but before the transfiguration (9:28-36).
  4. This episode happens in the context of prayer. Why do you think that is important? Where else do you see prayer as important in Jesus’ ministry and life in Luke?
  5. Jesus asks His disciples who the crowds say that He is (9:18)? What sort of answers do they give (9:19)? Look at Luke 8:25 and 9:7-9 for background on the thinking of the crowd.
  6. Next, Jesus asks the disciples about their own view of Him (9:20). What do you think Jesus’ intention was in turning this question from the crowds to the disciples?
  7. Peter responds that Jesus is “God’s Messiah” (NIV) or “the Christ of God” (ESV) [the word christos is the Greek equivalent for the Hebrew word messiah]. What is significant about this response from Peter?
  8. If Jesus asked you the question, “who do you say that I am?” how would you respond?
  9. What is one thing that God is speaking to you personally through this study? If you’re on your own, take some time to write it down and share it with someone later. If you are with a small group, share it with one another.

  


Daily Reading Plan

To encourage us together in our growth with God, we are arranging a weekday reading plan through this entire series with the Gospel of Luke. As you read each day, ask God to speak to you from His word.

Follow along with the reading plan below, through the Eastbrook app, or on social media.

Feb. 13           Luke 9:10-17; John 6:14-15
Feb. 14           John 6:25-40
Feb. 15           Luke 9:18-22; Matthew 16:13-20
Feb. 16           Luke 9:23-27; Mark 8:31-9:1
Feb. 17           2 Timothy 2:3-13

Messiah

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What do we see when we see Jesus?

This is the question at the center of my message, “Messiah,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church.  This was part of our series, “Jesus on the Move,” where we have been looking at the ministry of Jesus in northern Israel in the first half of the Gospel of Luke. Unlike other weeks where we combined several passages together around themes, this message focused on three verses in Luke 9:18-21.

You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

Also, join in with the weekday reading plan for this series here.

Seeing Jesus through the Eyes of the Crowds (Luke 9:18-19)

Jesus the Prophet:

  • like John the Baptist
  • like Elijah
  • like a prophet of long ago

The distance between Jesus and the view of the crowds

 

Seeing Jesus through the Eyes of the Disciples (Luke 9:20)

Jesus the Messiah of God

  • like Moses
  • like David
  • like other revolutionaries

The distance between Jesus and the view of the disciples

 

Seeing Jesus through Our Own Eyes

 

Sending (discussion questions)

jesus-on-the-move-series-gfx_app-squareHere are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Sending,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This is part of our series, “Jesus on the Move.” The text for this week are from Luke 9:1-6, 57-62; 10:1-24.

Discussion Questions:

  1. When did you really become a follower of Jesus in your life? What was the decisive moment for you? If it hasn’t happened yet, what has lead you to this point?
  2. As we continue the series “Jesus on the Move” this week, we will study three stories from Luke 9 and 10. Before you begin this study, ask God to speak to you from His Word. Then, whether you are alone or with a group, read Luke 9:1-6 and 10:1-24 aloud.
  3. These two episodes parallel one another. At a purely observational level, what is different about these two different stories of sending?
  4. In Luke 9:1-2 & 9:6, what do you notice about Jesus’ commissioning of the Twelve apostles and their fulfillment of that mission? Now compare what is similar or different about the commissioning of the 72 in Luke 10:1-3, 8, & 17.
  5. Jesus calls the disciples to have a lean ministry as they go out (see 9:3-4; 10:4-7). Why do you think Jesus instructed His disciples in this way?
  6. Now, turn to the third episode in Luke 9:57-62 and read it aloud. What is the key issue for the first of these three potential followers of Jesus (9:57-58)?
  7. What is the significant issue for the second follower (9:59-60)? What would you say is the meaning of Jesus’ response to this follower?
  8. The third potential follower encounters Jesus in 9:61-62. What is his key issue and what is Jesus addressing with him?
  9. Which of these three potential followers do you most relate to and why? What is one way Jesus’ words about following Him apply to you today?
  10. What is one thing that God is speaking to you personally through this study? If you’re on your own, take some time to write it down and share it with someone later. If you are with a small group, share it with one another.

  


Daily Reading Plan

To encourage us together in our growth with God, we are arranging a weekday reading plan through this entire series with the Gospel of Luke. As you read each day, ask God to speak to you from His word.

Follow along with the reading plan below, through the Eastbrook app, or on social media.

Feb. 6             Luke 9:1-9; Mark 6:7-13
Feb. 7             Luke 10:1-16; Matthew 11:20-24
Feb. 8             Luke 10:17-24; Isaiah 14:12-15
Feb. 9             Luke 9:57-62
Feb. 10           Luke 14:25-33