Worry and Faith (discussion questions)

Here are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Worry and Faith,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This is part of our series “The Kingdom Life.” The text for this week is Luke 12:22-34.

Discussion Questions:

  1. When have you experienced the greatest worry in your life? How did you deal with it?
  2. This weekend we continue “The Kingdom Life” series by looking at Luke 12:22-34. After beginning your study in prayer, ask God to speak to you, and then read those passages aloud.
  3. This teaching from Jesus begins with a strong exhortation not to worry. What does Jesus say not to worry about in 12:22, 29?
  4. Jesus offers two examples from nature – the birds and the wildflowers – for His disciples. What do these two examples tell us about worry and faith?
  5. What does Jesus tell us about God’s thoughts and actions on our behalf in relation to our worries (12:24, 30-31)?
  6. How have you learned to give your worry to God? Take a moment to read Philippians 4:6-7. How does this illustrate the connection between prayer and worry?
  7. Jesus’ summary statement in 12:31 is well-known. What do you think it means?
  8. In 12:32-34, Jesus exhorts His disciples to not fear, but to do something else instead. What does He call them to do?
  9. What do you think it means to live as a reflection of Jesus’ words in 12:34?
  10. What is one way that God is speaking to you personally through this study? If you’re on your own, write it down and share it with someone later. If you are with a small group, discuss this together.

 


Daily Reading Plan

To encourage us together in our growth with God, we arranged a daily reading plan through this series. You can also join in with the daily devotional here. As you read each day, ask God to speak to you from His word.

Monday, May 8                     Luke 12:22-26
Tuesday, May 9                    Matthew 6:25-27
Wednesday, May 10             Psalm 147:1-11
Thursday, May 11                 Luke 12:27-34
Friday, May 12                      Matthew 6:28-34

Worry and Faith

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we continued our series “The Kingdom Life” by exploring the topic of worry and faith. My message centered on Jesus’ words in Luke 12:22-34, giving some attention to John 20:19 and Philippians 4:6-7 as well.  Here’s my contention: if Jesus opens the doorway to God’s presence through the Cross and the Resurrection, then it is possible to move from a place of fear to fearlessness in our lives.

I started off with the results of the 3rd annual Survey of American Fears. I’m not sure what you’re most afraid of, but you might enjoy looking at the last few entries on the list of all fears Americans have.

You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

Also, you are welcome to join in with the daily reading plan for this series.

 

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The Return of Christ: 5 Aspects and 3 Images

MP900438983This morning I had the privilege of speaking at Eastbrook‘s monthly men’s breakfast on the topic: “Jesus Our Coming King.” I began with an overview of the narrative arc of Jesus’ life:

  • Nativity and birth
  • Life: teaching, miracles, mission
  • Crucifixion
  • Resurrection
  • Ascension
  • Intercession
  • Return

I then shared five aspects of Jesus’ return:

  1. It will happen (Acts 1:8; John 14:3)
  2. It will happen in God’s time (Acts 1:6-7; Matthew 24:36)
  3. It will be recognizable to all (1 Thessalonians 4:15; Revelation 1:7-8)
  4. It will bring the fullness of Christ’s victorious kingdom over all (Revelation 19:11-16; 21:1-5)
  5. It will bring vindication for God’s people in the sight of all (1 Thessalonians 4:11-5; 1 John 3:2)

I closed with three images from Scripture on how we should live within the time between Christ’s first and second comings:

1. We are groomsmen – friends of the bridegroom (John 3:27-30)

  • waiting
  • listening
  • preparing the bride for the bridegroom

2. We are ambassadors for Christ (2 Corinthians 5:17-20)

  • given the message of reconciliation between God and men in Christ
  • God makes an appeal through us

3. We are watchmen (Psalm 130:6;  Timothy 2:3-7)

  • we are watching
  • we are at the ready
  • we are like soldiers and athletes prepared for action

N. T. Wright on Jesus’ Second Coming

N T WrightI’ve been studying for a message I’m giving this Saturday morning on “Christ our Coming King” for Eastbrook‘s monthly men’s breakfast. I came across this quotation from N. T. Wright in his book Surprised by Hope, that captures so much in such a small space that I couldn’t help but share it.

What we have here, with minor variations, is a remarkably unanimous view spread throughout the early Christianity known to us. There will come a time, which might indeed come at any time, when, in the great renewal of the world that Easter itself foreshadowed, Jesus himself will be personally present and will be the agent and model of the transformation that will happen both to the whole world and also to believers. This expectation and hope, expressed so clearly in the New Testament, continues undiminished in the second and subsequent centuries. Mainstream Christians throughout the early period were not worried by the fact that the event had not happened within a generation. The idea that the problem of ‘delay’ set out in 2 Peter 3 was widespread in second-generation Christianity is a modern scholar’s myth rather than a historical reality. Nor was the idea of Jesus’s ‘appearing’ or ‘coming’ simply part of a tradition that was passed on uncritically without later generations really tuning in to what it was saying. As with the ascension, so with Jesus’s appearing: it was seen as a vital part of a full presentation of the Jesus who was and is and is to come. Without it all the church’s proclamation makes no sense. Take it away, and all sorts of things start to unravel. The early Christians saw this as clearly as anyone since, and we would do well to learn from them.

(N. T. Wright, Surprised by Hope, page 136)

The Cost of Discipleship (discussion questions)

Here are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “The Cost of Discipleship,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This is part of our series “The Kingdom Life.” The two texts for this week are Luke 13:22-30 and Luke 14:25-35.

Discussion Questions:

  1. When have you done something that really cost you something or had to sacrifice one pursuit for another?
  2. This weekend we continue “The Kingdom Life” series by looking at two passages Luke 13:22-30 and 14:25-35. Begin your study in prayer, asking God to speak to you, and then read those passages aloud.
  3. Jesus makes a statement and then tells a parable that illumines that statement in 13:22-27. How would you summarize what Jesus is saying here?
  4. There are several implications of Jesus’ teaching, which He outlines in 13:28-30. Which of these stands out most strongly to you?
  5. In Luke 14, Jesus delvers further into the costs of following Him. In verses 26-27, how does Jesus describe the cost of discipleship?
  6. Jesus offers two examples of rightly assessing the cost in 14:28-32. What do those tell you about following Him?
  7. When has following Jesus cost you something relationally, materially, or in terms of suffering?
  8. Jesus’ description of salt not losing its saltiness conveys something not losing its value by ceasing to be what it is. What might this mean in terms of discipleship?
  9. What is one way that God is speaking to you personally through this study? If you’re on your own, write it down and share it with someone later. If you are with a small group, discuss this together.

Daily Reading Plan

To encourage us together in our growth with God, we arranged a daily reading plan through this series. You can also join in with the daily devotional here. As you read each day, ask God to speak to you from His word.

Monday, May 1         Luke 13:22-30
Tuesday, May 2        Matthew 7:13-14
Wednesday, May 3  Matthew 19:16-30
Thursday, May 4       Luke 14:25-35
Friday, May 5             Matthew 10:37-39