Habakkuk [God in the Ruins]

God in the Ruins Series GFX_App SquareLike many other churches, this past weekend at Eastbrook we had to make a major shift in our gathering due to the concerns related to COVID-19 and coronavirus. This was accentuated by the declaration of a public health emergency in our state, and the recommendation that groups over 250 no longer meet. We switched to online service for this past weekend, but still continued our series on the message of the minor prophets, “God in the Ruins,” by looking at the prophet Habakkuk.

Habakkuk is one of the 7th century BC prophets in the Hebrew Bible, ministering near the time of Nahum, Zephaniah, and Jeremiah. Habakkuk’s prophetic message is gathered into book form in the following structure:

  • Habakkuk’s first complaint and God’s answer (1:1-11)
  • Habakkuk’s second complaint and God’s answer (1:12-2:20)
  • a final prayer of trust and worship (3:1-19)

You can view the message from this past weekend and follow along with the message outline below. You can also engage with the entire series on the minor prophets here or download the Eastbrook mobile app for even more opportunities to connect.

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Nahum [God in the Ruins]

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This past weekend at Eastbrook I continued our series on the message of the minor prophets, “God in the Ruins,” by looking at the prophet Nahum.

Nahum is one of those books that can feel especially “minor” in the minor prophets, with a tough message for a very historically specific context. Nahum is one of the 7th century BC prophets in the Hebrew Bible, including Habakkuk, Zephaniah, and Jeremiah. The book basically falls into two major sections with chapter 1 focusing on God as judge and chapters 2-3 focusing on the judgment God will bring on Nineveh.

You can view the message from this past weekend and follow along with the message outline below. You can also engage with the entire series on the minor prophets here or download the Eastbrook mobile app for even more opportunities to connect.

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Micah, part 1 [God in the Ruins]

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This past weekend at Eastbrook I continued our series on the message of the minor prophets, “God in the Ruins,” by looking at the first five chapters of the book of Micah.

Micah prophesied to both the northern and southern kingdoms during the reigns of kings Jotham (742-735 BC), Ahaz (735-715 BC), and Hezekiah (715-686 BC). He is mentioned in the book of Jeremiah as one who spoke during Hezekiah’s reign (Jeremiah 26:18). He witnesses the fall of Samaria and the northern kingdom in 722 BC, but also speaks about the coming exile for the southern kingdom, which happens after the time of his ministry. Micah hailed from Moresheth Gath, about 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem. His name literally means “Who is like Yahweh?” and his prophecies focus on both the doom coming upon a straying people and the hope that God will bring.

You can watch my message from this past weekend and follow along with the message outline below. You can also engage with the entire series on the minor prophets here or download the Eastbrook mobile app for even more opportunities to connect.

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Joel [God in the Ruins]

God in the Ruins Series GFX_App SquareAs we continued our series, “God in the Ruins: The Message of the Minor Prophets,” this past weekend at Eastbrook I walked us through the prophet Joel. Joel is an often overlooked book of the Bible, although a couple of passages are fairly familiar because of their connection with historic markers in the church year: Ash Wednesday (Joel 2:12-17) and Pentecost (Joel 2:28-32). Still, Joel’s message speaks to us of the gospel, where both the judgment of God and the grace of God meet. Joel is one of the most difficult of the minor prophets to locate chronologically, but due to name usage and references to other parts of Scripture it seems most likely that it falls in the time after the exile.

You can watch my message from this past weekend and follow along with the message outline below. You can also engage with the entire series on the minor prophets here or download the Eastbrook mobile app for even more opportunities to connect.

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