Faith-full Public Engagement

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we concluded our series, “The Kingdom of God.” This week’s message specifically addressed the intersection of Christian discipleship and the public square, with attention to the topic of faith and politics.

You can view the message video and outline for the message is below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Nations will come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your dawn.” (Isaiah 60:3)

Two Insufficient Ideas about Political Engagement

  • “Faith has no place in politics!”
  • “Politics has no place in faith!”
  • Our faith in Jesus Christ has political implications.

Four Theological Truths that Should Shape Our Political Engagement

  • Creation calling: Human beings are called by God to exercise dominion over the earth (Genesis 1:26-28)
  • Sin’s complication: Sin and the fall from grace has impacted every aspect of society (Romans 8:20)
  • Jesus is Lord: everything is subject to Him, and we will reign with Him (Philippians 2:10-11; 2 Timothy 2:11-12)
  • Love and truth: God’s kingdom agenda must guide us (John 3:16; 1:14)

Six Questions for Faith-full Political Engagement

  • Am I living out of a growing life with God that brings the fruit of the Spirit into my politics?
  • Have I taken steps to be informed on the issues at hand or am I taking action out of lack of knowledge?
  • Am I approaching this issue rooted in my kingdom citizenship and the agenda of God’s kingdom or from my earthly citizenship and political agenda alone?
  • How will my activity cultivate love for my neighbor and promote love, justice, truth, and moral order as God defines it?
  • How will my action serve the common good, not just for me and people like me but for all people?

How will my action promote the glory of God and the kingship of Christ both in the church and the broader world?


Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the theme of the kingdom of God in one or more of the following ways:

The Kingdom of God and the Kingdoms of This World

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we continued our series, “The Kingdom of God” by exploring the ways in which our citizenship in the kingdom interfaces with our earthly citizenship. I proposed that we need to live by the power of the Holy Spirit as exiles in and for the world, concluding with five practices that may help us live this out.

You can view the message video and outline for the message is below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“If you declare with your mouth, ‘Jesus is Lord,’ and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.” (Romans 10:9)

“Jesus is Lord!”

  • The closeness of the kingdom and responding to Jesus (Mark 1:15)
  • The fundamental declaration of faith (Romans 10:9)
  • Everything is subject to Christ and God’s kingdom (Philippians 2:10-11)

Kingdom Citizens: Recognizing our Dual Citizenship

  • We are citizens of God’s kingdom (Philippians 3:20)
  • We are citizens of earthly kingdoms

Living by the Spirit as Exiles in the World

  • Remember God’s kingdom is a different sort of kingdom (John 18:33-36)
  • Remember we are a holy nation established by God in Christ (1 Peter 2:9-10)
  • Remembering we are exiles scattered in the world (1 Peter 1:1-2; 2:11-12)
  • Remember God has delegated authority to earthly rulers and kingdoms (John 19:10-11; Romans 13:1-2)

Living by the Spirit as Exiles for the World

  • Living as exiles for the blessing of the places we are scattered by God (Jeremiah 29:4-7)
  • Living as good citizens within the structures as established by God (Romans 13:1-7)
  • Living in Christian service in relation to the needs of the world (Matthew 25:31-46)
  • Living prophetically in relation to the powers and authorities (Acts 4:8-20)

Five Practices of Kingdom Citizens amidst Earthly Kingdoms

  • Hold to our primary citizenship
  • Discern the times and agendas
  • Walk by the Spirit
  • Maintain perspective
  • Live in the tension of hope

Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the theme of the kingdom of God in one or more of the following ways:

  • Memorize Romans 10:9 or Philippians 3:20.
  • Take time to meditate on Jesus’ encounter with Pontius Pilate in John 18:33-36; 19:10-11. Respond to the passage by drawing, painting, journaling, or going for a walk to pray.
  • Based on this message and study guide, talk with a friend or journal on your own about what it means to live in the tension of hope as a citizen of the kingdom of God and a citizen of an earthly kingdom.
  • Join us for the Leadership Community with Dr. Vince Bacote on Monday, September 28, at 7 PM, as he speaks on “The Political Disciple: A Theology of Public Life.”

St. Augustine on “Thy Kingdom Come”

As we journey through a series on the kingdom of God at Eastbrook, I encountered these word by St. Augustine of Hippo from a sermon on the Lord’s Prayer in the Gospel of Matthew. I appreciated the way that Augustine reflects on the kingdom of our lives in relation to God’s kingdom.


Your kingdom come. Come it surely will, whether we ask or no. Indeed, God has an eternal kingdom. For when did He not reign? When did He begin to reign? For His kingdom has no beginning, neither shall it have any end. But that we may know that in this prayer also we pray for ourselves, and not for God (for we do not say, Your kingdom come, as though we were asking that God may reign); we shall be ourselves His kingdom, if believing in Him we make progress in this faith. All the faithful, redeemed by the Blood of His Only Son, will be His kingdom. And this His kingdom will come, when the resurrection of the dead shall have taken place; for then He will come Himself. And when the dead are risen, He will divide them, as He Himself says, and He shall set some on the right hand, and some on the left. To those who shall be on the right hand He will say, Come, you blessed of My Father, receive the kingdom. This is what we wish and pray for when we say, Your kingdom come; that it may come to us. For if we shall be reprobates, that kingdom will come to others, but not to us. But if we shall be of that number, who belong to the members of His Only-begotten Son, His kingdom will come to us, and will not tarry. For are there as many ages yet remaining, as have already passed away? The Apostle John has said, My little children, it is the last hour. But it is a long hour proportioned to this long day; and see how many years this last hour lasts. But nevertheless, be ye as those who watch, and so sleep, and rise again, and reign. Let us watch now, let us sleep in death; at the end we shall rise again, and shall reign without end.

Your will be done as in heaven, so in earth. The third thing we pray for is, that His will may be done as in heaven so in earth. And in this too we wish well for ourselves. For the will of God must necessarily be done. It is the will of God that the good should reign, and the wicked be damned. Is it possible that this will should not be done? But what good do we wish for ourselves, when we say, Your will be done as in heaven, so in earth? Give ear. For this petition may be understood in many ways, and many things are to be in our thoughts in this petition, when we pray God, Your will be done as in heaven, so in earth. As Your Angels offend You not, so may we also not offend You. Again, how is Your will be done, as in heaven, so in earth, understood? All the holy Patriarchs, all the Prophets, all the Apostles, all the spiritual are as it were God’s heaven; and we in comparison of them are earth. Your will be done, as in heaven, so in earth; as in them, so in us also. Again, Your will be done, as in heaven, so in earth; the Church of God is heaven, His enemies are earth. So we wish well for our enemies, that they too may believe and become Christians, and so the will of God be done, as in heaven, so also in earth. Again, Your will be done, as in heaven, so in earth. Our spirit is heaven, and the flesh earth. As our spirit is renewed by believing, so may our flesh be renewed by rising again; and the will of God be done, as in heaven, so in earth. Again, our mind whereby we see truth, and delight in this truth, is heaven; as, I delight in the law of God, after the inward man. What is the earth? I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind? When this strife shall have passed away, and a full concord brought about of the flesh and spirit, the will of God will be done as in heaven, so also in earth. When we repeat this petition, let us think of all these things, and ask them all of the Father. Now all these things which we have mentioned, these three petitions, beloved, have respect to the life eternal. For if the Name of our God is sanctified in us, it will be for eternity. If His kingdom come, where we shall live for ever, it will be for eternity. If His will be done as in heaven, so in earth, in all the ways which I have explained, it will be for eternity.

The Holy Spirit in Us: Living in the Kingdom of God Now

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we continued our series, “The Kingdom of God.” This first two weeks of the series I explored the theme of the kingdom of God through the Old Testament and New Testament. This week , I walked through three main aspects of living in the kingdom of God: personally living in the kingdom, living as the community of God in the kingdom, and joining God’s kingdom work in the world.

You can view the message video and outline for the message is below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“For the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking, 
but of righteousness, peace and joy in the Holy Spirit’” (Romans 14:17)

I: Life in God’s Kingdom by the Spirit

  • Life in the Spirit (Romans 14:17-18)
  • The surprisingly blessed life  (Matthew 5:2-12)
  • The obedient and fruitful life (Galatians 5:13-26)

We: Life Together in God’s Kingdom by the Spirit

  • The community that takes on Christ’s kingly character (Ephesians 4:14-16)
  • The community that takes on Christ’s servant character (Philippians 2:1-11)

They: Kingdom Mission with the Spirit

  • Word: The Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20; Acts 1:8)
  • Deed: The Great Commandment  (Matthew 22:34-40)

Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper into the theme of living in the kingdom of God in one or more of the following ways:

Jesus is Lord: Tracing the Kingdom of God in the New Testament

This past weekend at Eastbrook Church we continued our series, “The Kingdom of God.” This first weekend I explored the theme of the kingdom of God through the Old Testament, and this week I took a similar journey through the New Testament.

You can view the message video and outline for the message is below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Jesus said, ‘The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!’” (Mark 1:15)

Jesus and the Gospel of the Kingdom (Luke 4:16-21; Mark 1:14-15; Matthew 4:23; 9:35)

  • Fulfilling the promise
  • Proclaiming the kingdom
  • Calling for repentance
  • Bringing healing and salvation
  • Telling stories of the kingdom

Jesus, the Kingdom, the Cross, and the Resurrection

  • The King crucified: representative and sacrifice (Mark 15:22-24; Galatians 3:13; 2 Corinthians 5:21; 1 Corinthians 1:18-25)
  • The King and the powers: conflict and victory (John 18:33-38; Colossians 2:13-15)
  • The King resurrected: the first step of total renewal (Mark 16:1-8; 1 Corinthians 15:20-24)

The Church and the Kingdom

  • The church witnesses to the kingdom by the Holy Spirit’s power (Acts 1:8; 2:1-4; 8:12; 19:8)
  • The church lives in the kingdom of God as both now and not yet (Mark 1:15; 1 Corinthians 6:9; James 2:5)

The Fullness of the Kingdom Yet to Come

  • Living for the kingdom yet to come (Hebrews 11:10, 13, 14)
  • Two visions of the eternal kingdom (Revelation 7:9-10; 21:1-6)

Key themes of the kingdom of God in the New Testament

  • Jesus is King and God’s kingdom has arrived
  • In His crucifixion and resurrection, Jesus brings salvation, healing, and victory in God’s kingdom
  • God’s people play a part as witnesses to God’s kingdom before the nations
  • God’s kingdom has come, yet its fullness is yet to come