Needing Limits (Palmer, Let Your Life Speak 3)

Later in Let Your Life Speak, Parker Palmer addresses our own need for limits and the temptation toward burn-out for those who really care about their work.

If you are like me and don’t readily admit your limits, embarrassment may be the only way to get your attention. I go on full alert only when I am blocked or get derailed or flat-out fail. Then, finally, I may be forced to face my nature and find out whether I can make something of both my gifts and my limitations. (p. 42)

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Negative Projections (Palmer, Let Your Life Speak 2)

Here are a few words from Parker Palmer on wrong approaches to thinking about our vocation:

Here, I think, is another clue to finding true self and vocation: we must withdraw the negative projections we make on people and situations – projections that serve mainly to mask our fears about ourselves – and acknowledge and embrace our own liabilities and limits. (Let Your Life Speak, p. 29)

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Vocation (Palmer, Let Your Life Speak 1)

Over the next five days, I am simply going to share some words that have impacted me deeply from Parker J. Palmer’s outstanding book, Let Your Life Speak. If you have not read this book yet and have questions about your identity, vocation, and living well, please take the time to read it.

Here are some words from Palmer on vocation:

Vocation at its deepest level is, “This is something I can’t not do, for reasons I’m unable to explain to anyone else and don’t fully understand myself but that are nonetheless compelling. (p. 25)

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