Let Your Light Shine

I came across the quotation while studying for a message from Jesus’ Sermon on the Mount on God’s people living as light. As a pastor, I found these words convicting and encouraging. I hope you are blessed by them as well.

The church leader should be equipped with all the virtues. He should be poor, so that he can chastise greed with a free voice. He should always be someone who sighs at inordinate pleasure, whether in himself or in others. He is ready to confront those who do not hesitate before they sin and those who do not feel sorry for having sinned after they sin. So let him sigh and lament. Let him show thereby that this world is difficult and dangerous for the faithful. He should be somebody who hungers and thirsts for justice, so that he might have the strength confidently to arouse by God’s Word those who are lazy in good works. He knows how to use the whip of rebuke, but more by his example than by his voice. He should be gentle. He rules the church more by mercy than by punishment. He desires more to be loved than feared. He should be merciful to others but severe with himself. He sets on the scales a heavy weight of justice for himself but for others a light weight He should be pure of heart. He does not entangle himself in earthly affairs, but more so he does not even think of them.

Anonymous, Incomplete Work on Matthew, Homily 10 in Matthew 1-13, ed. Manlio Simonetti, Ancient Christian Commentary on Scripture 1A (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2001), 95.

Living Like Light in the World

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As I concluded our series, “Will You Be My Neighbor?”, this past weekend at Eastbrook, I took a practical look at how John 8:12 and Matthew 5:14 fit together in our faith and practice. In these two verse, a theme of light from God shining through Jesus and His people come together, yet in different directions:

“When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, ‘I am the light of the world.’” (John 8:12)

“You are the light of the world.” (Matthew 5:14) 

There is a lot in here, but as it was a family worship weekend for us, I tried to use more story-telling and practical application to our lives. Maybe that worked and maybe it didn’t. You can watch/listen and let me know.

You can view the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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Murder, Adultery and Theft

Chiseled ThumbI continued our series, “Chiseled,” on the Ten Commandments this weekend at Eastbrook Church by looking at the sixth, seventh and eighth commandments from Exodus 20:13-15.

These are the most brief and bluntly worded commandments of the Decalogue. I brought together Jesus’ parallels to these commandments in the Sermon on the Mount in order to talk about two basic truths:

  1. Our hearts are worse than we think
  2. God’s grace is greater than we understand

The outline and presentation slides for the message are below. You can view the message online here or listen to it via our audio podcast here. Access all the messages from the series here. You can also visit Eastbrook Church on VimeoFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

This series is part three of an occasional series we are doing from Exodus. You can enjoy the first two parts of this extended series on Exodus here:

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Set Apart

Chiseled ThumbThis weekend at Eastbrook Church, I continued our series, “Chiseled,” on the Ten Commandments by looking at the third and fourth commandments from Exodus 20:7-11.

While we may not immediately see a connection between the command about not misusing God’s name and the command about keeping the Sabbath, they have a lot in common. They are both about keeping something as “set apart,” which is a reflection of God being “set apart,” or holy. So, the message was about having set apart words and set apart time.

The outline for the message is below. You can view the message online here or listen to it via our audio podcast here. Access all the messages from the series here. You can also visit Eastbrook Church on VimeoFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

This series is part three of an occasional series we are doing from Exodus. You can enjoy the first two parts of this extended series on Exodus here:

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The Ten (discussion questions)

Here are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “The Ten,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church, which began our new series on the Ten Commandments entitled “Chiseled.”

Discussion Questions:

1. When you hear the phrase “Ten Commandments” what do you think of? Why?

2. This weekend at Eastbrook, we begin a new series entitled “Chiseled” on the Ten Commandments. This series accompanies the season of Lent, which is a season of drawing near to God and renewing our hope in Jesus by turning from sin and clinging to the Gospel. This mirrors the journey of the Hebrew people from slavery in Egypt to a new land guided by God’s deliverance. In preparation for this study, read Exodus 19:1-20:21. (If you haven’t read the entire book of Exodus before, make it a goal to do so during this series.) Then, ask God to speak to you through your study of the Scripture.

3. The story of Exodus moves from slavery in Egypt to the clash between God and Pharaoh in the plagues on to deliverance from slavery and movement toward the land of promise. The Ten Commandments are an identity marker for God and for the Hebrew people as they become the nation of Israel. Read Exodus 19:3-6. What do these brief words tell you about who God is, what He is doing, and what it means to be His people?Read More »

The Ten

Chiseled ThumbThis weekend at Eastbrook Church, I began our new series on the Ten Commandments entitled “Chiseled.”

The message was really an introduction on how we can see the Ten Commandments as God’s words of life, love, and mission to God’s people. I also spent time reflecting on how we should read the Ten Commandments as followers of Jesus.

The outline for the message is below. You can view the message online here or listen to it via our audio podcast here. You can also visit Eastbrook Church on VimeoFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

This series is part three of an occasional series we are doing from Exodus. You can listen to the first two parts of this series here:

Read More »