The Weekend Wanderer: 9 March 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

Lent fast word cloud“What to Give Up for Lent 2019? Consider Twitter’s Top 100 Ideas” – Once again, you can follow in real time what Twitter users say they are giving up for Lent, which this year begins on Ash Wednesday, March 6.  As in past years, food is the most popular category for abstention, followed by technology and ‘vices’ like smoking and drinking alcohol. After analyzing the first 1,500 tweets—both serious and sarcastic—OpenBible.info’s Stephen Smith noted that ‘perennial favorites’ such as social networking, alcohol, and Twitter lead the list so far.”

 

Screen Shot 2019-03-06 at 11.57.21 AM“In Praise of Boredom” – With reference to Matthew Crawford’s The World Beyond Your Head, James K. A. Smith engages with the dehumanizing aspects of distraction and the importance of boredom for our recovery. “But how to overcome distraction? How to break through the bedazzling glare of our screens, the latest threat to parade as an angel of light? The problem isn’t simply that the technologies of distraction prevent us from making or appreciating art. This isn’t simply a competition for attention. The concern is more egregious: our distraction demeans us.”

 

iphone keyboard“Repenting in the age of iPhones and instant gratification” – Lent helps us learn repentance in our lives at multiple levels. Elizabeth Kirkland Cahill reflects on what this mean in the smart phone, social media culture. “The work of naming our wrongdoing to ourselves and to God is unlikely to bring immediate gratification. Nor will it engender the sort of external and public validation we may crave from our frequent forays into Twitter, Snapchat or FaceBook. The Creator of all will not be giving a ‘thumbs up’ to our expressions of remorse. The Divine Majesty is probably not going to ‘follow’ our episodic utterances of regret on Instagram. No, repentance is an I-Thou exercise.”

 

Welcoming the Stranger“A Migrant Invasion?”Noah Toly, Professor of Urban Studies at Wheaton College, reviews the revised edition of Matthew Soerens and Jenny Yang’s Welcoming the Stranger. Both Matt and Jenny were part of our Mission Fest at Eastbrook a couple of years ago, and this updated edition of the book is even more timely given our current debates. Toly offers a fine review of the book with helpful reflections on why Soerens and Yang’s work is “more than a counterpoint to anti-immigrant uproar, it is an antidote to the propagandistic way of being in the world.”

 

hands folded“Integrating Justice Into our Spiritual Disciplines”Kevin Garcia opens a discussion about gaps in classical spiritual formation related to justice, reflecting on ways that he has attempted to integrate the pursuit of justice within his spiritual formation rhythms. “Everyday there are several rhythms that shape our beliefs. What podcast do we play the most? What books do we read? What channel do we go to for our news? Who do we follow on Twitter? I began thinking more deeply about this recently as our church joined in a fast to start the new year. During this time, I immersed myself in some works considered classics on spiritual disciplines.”

 

Pope Pius XII“Vatican to open secret archives on World War II-era and Pope Pius” – “Pope Francis has announced that the Vatican next year will open its secret archives containing World War II-era documents from the controversial papacy of Pope Pius XII. The archives cover the years 1939-1958 and consist of several hundred thousand letters, cables and speeches. Critics of Pius say he did not do enough to publicly combat the rise of fascism in Germany and Italy. Supporters say he worked diligently behind the scenes to save Jews from the Holocaust.”

 

Macrina“This Church Mother Comforted the Grieving with Scientific Thinking” – “In AD 379, Basil the Great, one of the men who contributed to the Nicene Creed, died. Basil and his brother Gregory of Nyssa were two of the three Cappadocian Fathers­—men responsible for major theological decisions made in the early life of the Christian church. What is less well known is that they also had an older sister, Macrina. She was deeply precious to them for her love, her insight, and her wisdom; they even called her ‘Teacher.'”

 

gary saul morson“The greatest of all novels” –  At The New Criterion, Gary Saul Morson reflects on how Leo Tolstoy explores the complexities – not the simplicity – of human existence in his masterpiece, War and Peace. “All purported social sciences held that, as with Newtonian astronomy, the complexity of observed phenomena was explicable by a few simple laws. But with society and individual psyches, Tolstoy insisted, the very opposite is the case: ‘the deeper we delve in search of these [fundamental] causes,’ Tolstoy observes, ‘the more of them we find.’ Things do not simplify, they ramify.”

 

Music: “Forgive Us” from At the Foot of the Cross, volume 2, featuring Julie Miller, David Mullen, and Gene Eugene.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 23 June 2018

The “Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly post in which I gather a smattering of news, stories, resources, and other media you could explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

Jeff SessionsRomans 13 and Illegal Immigration? This past week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions referenced Romans 13 in support of the Trump administration’s policy of dealing with illegal immigration by separating children from parents. Daniel Burke attempts to look at the text in light of our current democratic context. Matt Soerens of World Relief highlights the fact that Romans 13 cannot justify separating children from families. Then there’s Greg Strand of the Evangelical Free Church of America who speaks out against separating children from families on the basis of love for God and love for neighbor. David Gerson offers a pointed critique of the current administration’s policy: “the centerpiece commitment of Christian social ethics is not order; it is justice. For a good introduction to the concept, Sessions might read the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘Letter from Birmingham Jail.’ ‘A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God,’ King argued. ‘An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law.’ And how should justice be defined? ‘Any law that uplifts human personality is just. Any law that degrades human personality is unjust.'” It’s always interesting when parts of the Bible become headline news.

 

Andrew Brunson 2“Experts Say Turkey’s Indictment of Rev. Brunson Full of ‘Blatant Lies'” – Lela Gilbert, an adjunct fellow at the Center for Religious Freedom, speaks to the terrible situation that Andrew Brunson is going through in Turkey. She writes: “Turkey’s formal indictment of U.S. Presbyterian Pastor Andrew Brunson is so tenuous and thinly supported it strongly suggests humanitarian groups are justified in their argument that he is a diplomatic hostage rather than a legitimate criminal suspect.”

 

3000“To survive our high-speed society, cultivate ‘temporal bandwidth'” – So says Alan Jacobs in a recent essay in The Guardian. “It is hard to imagine a time more completely presentist than our own, more tethered to the immediate…to find a healthier alternative, we must cultivate what the great American novelist Thomas Pynchon calls ‘temporal bandwidth” – an awareness of our experience as extending into the past and the future.”

 

82470“4 Ways to Share God’s Love in Summertime” – In light of recent studies revealing that American Christians are unlikely to share their faith, Tina Osterhouse offers four practical ways we can share God’s love in the “ordinary time” of summer. Take a look at this realistic and down-to-earth approach to evangelism. Then, go out and try something that she mentions.

 

milky-way“It Is Highly Unlikely That Any of This Exists: On the Origins of the Universe” – Over at Literary Hub, Oren Harman tells us honestly, that any of this exists at all is so very, very random. He delves into the search for dark matter at the beginning of the universe.

 

elevator“What Was the Point of Elevator Music?” – Since you probably have been thinking about this (or not) for quite some time, Patrick Carrajat comes to the rescue to save us from false thinking about the rationale behind elevator music. “‘I don’t think elevator music was really designed to soothe the raging beast,’ says Patrick Carrajat. Instead, he says, elevator music was there to…” Well, I guess you will have to read the article in order to find out why. [Thanks to the Prufrock News for this article.]

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]