Is the Kingdom of God Fair?

In Matthew 19:16-20:16 we read one of Jesus’ most challenging conversations, an exchange with a wealthy young man, which is followed by a parable about workers in a vineyard. It is challenging to read both because the wealthy young man struggles with Jesus, but also because the parable quickly touches upon some of our in-built cultural values in North America.

First, the wealthy young man cannot give all for following Jesus because the possessions in his life have too strong a grip on him. He cannot obey Jesus’ words, “go, sell your possessions and give to the poor…then come, follow me” (Matthew 19:21). The greatness of his wealth became a roadblock to his discipleship. “For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also” (Matthew 6:21). The apostles are flabbergasted in light of the prevailing Jewish view that wealth affirms God’s blessing on one’s life. If those who are wealthy cannot enter the kingdom with ease (19:23-24) then what about those who are not wealthy? What about the ones, like them, who have little and have even given their meager resources for the kingdom? How much more difficult, they thought, will it be for people with little to enter the kingdom.

And so, Jesus goes on to tell a parable to expand on the idea that “many who are first will be last, and many who are last will be first” (19:30). It is a parable of troublesome grace for those, like me, who operate on the system of fairness. A landowner hires five rounds of workers through the course of the day to work in his vineyard. While those hired first worked all day, those hired last worked only a few hours. But here is where the scandalous grace comes in: the landowner pays all the workers the same day’s wage regardless of when they began work. The earliest workers agreed to this (20:2, 13), but they are offended by the generosity of the landowner. In the back of my mind, a voice cries out like an alarm: “it’s just not fair!”

But that is just the point. The Kingdom of God is not about fairness, but about grace. What the earliest followers of Jesus thought was the system of fairness in God’s blessing was turned upside down. “Many who are first will be last, and many who are last will be first.” Why? Because in His scandalous generosity, God unleashes grace without measure on all who come to Him. Whether early or late, we all receive an equal portion of the grace of God that is without measure or bounds.

Makoto Fujimura, The Four Holy Gospels

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Makoto Fujimura, Charis-Kairos (The Tears of Christ), Mineral Pigments, Gold on Belgium Linen; 2011.
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Makoto Fujimura, Matthew (Consider the Lilies); Mineral Pigments, Kumohada Paper, Gold, Platinum and Sumi Ink on Paper; 2011.
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Makoto Fujimura, Mark (Water Flames); Nihonga, Gold, and Vermillion on Paper; 2011.
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Makoto Fujimura, Luke (Prodigal God); Nihonga, Platinum, Minerals, Gold and Oyster Shell “Gofun” on Paper; 2011.
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Makoto Fujimura, John (In the Beginning); Nihonga, Platinum and Sumi on Paper; 2011.

||40days|| week five: follow to freedom

Walking out of prison is not something you do. Even with all of the mystique of stories about prison escapes, when it comes right down to it, prisons are places you go to but don’t get out of by your own will or effort.

But what if someone sets you free?

In this fifth week of the ||40days|| journey we are looking at following Jesus. In Matthew’s Gospel we read what appears to be an autobiographical account of Jesus calling Matthew to follow Him. Matthew is a tax collector for the Romans who, like most in his trade, was likely enriching himself at the expense of his own people. He was not liked by the Romans because he was a Jew, while at the same time he was not liked much by the Jews because he was seen a traitor and a thief. Matthew is caught up in a prison both of his own choices and his circumstances. It is at this point that we read about a very straightforward encounter between Jesus and Matthew:

As Jesus went on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the tax collector’s booth. ‘Follow Me,’ He told him, and Matthew got up and followed Him. (Matthew 9:9)

Sometimes the prisons that hold us are not physical but spiritual realities with personal and social impact. Read More »