Encountering Jesus the Healer and Deliverer

“That evening after sunset the people brought to Jesus all the sick and demon-possessed. The whole town gathered at the door, and Jesus healed many who had various diseases. He also drove out many demons, but he would not let the demons speak because they knew who he was.” (Mark 1:32-34)

Jesus is the healer and deliverer. He knows the depth of our sickness and oppression. He understands the cause and the symptoms in ways we do not understand and can discern the difference. He is able to draw near in the mess with full awareness of human frailty, sin, and brokenness, yet without apprehension or distaste. At the same time He is not overcome by our frailty, sin, and brokenness, and neither does He sense the need to accommodate to it. He is motivated instead by a perfect love that impels Him to reach out toward us.

Jesus does not love us in spite of our sickness and oppression but in the midst of it. He can see us clearly as we are, while also seeing us clearly for what we could be without diminishment of love. With all that, and even with our human tendency to draw back when our vulnerabilities are revealed, Jesus draws near with the touch of healing and deliverance.

Let us be like those who are sick and demon-possessed in Mark 1. Let us also flock to Jesus, knowing He is the One who can handle all the weakness, sin, and affliction we can bring to Him.

Questioning Jesus

This past weekend at Eastbrook, as we continues our preaching series during Lent entitled “Scandalous Jesus,” we looked at the final two in a series of questions-answer exchanges Jesus has in Jerusalem. Found in Matthew 22:34-46, Jesus first responds to a question about the greatest commandment from a Pharisee (22:34-40) and then poses His own question from Psalm 110 about whose son the Messiah is (22:41-45).

These questions bring us to an encounter with the question of Jesus we all must answer: “Who do you say I am?”

This message is from the ninth part of our longer journey through the Gospel of Matthew, which includes “Family Tree,” “Power in Preparation,” “Becoming Real,” “The Messiah’s Mission,” “Stories of the Kingdom,” “Who Do You Say I Am?“, “‘Tis the Reason,” and “Jesus Said What?!

You can find the message video and outline below. You can also view the entire series here. Join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: ‘Teacher, which is the greatest commandment in the Law?’” (Matthew 22:35-36)

Questions and Jesus

The context of the questions: “the Pharisees went out and laid plans to trap him in his words” (Matthew 22:15)

Question 1: Pharisees – “should we pay the Roman poll tax?” (22:16-22)

Question 2: Sadducees – “how does marriage work in the resurrection?” (22:23-33)

Question 3: Pharisees – “which is the greatest commandment?” (22:34-40)

Question 4: Jesus – “whose son is the Messiah?” (22:41-45)

The end of the questions: “from that day on no one dared to ask him any more questions” (22:46)

Which is the Greatest Commandment? (22:34-40)

The nature of the question

  • This was a common question
  • Other answers given

Jesus’ response

  • The centrality of love (not just certain activities)
  • Drawn from the Torah (not elsewhere)
  • Summarizing two tables of the Decalogue (relationship to God and others)
  • The uniqueness of Jesus’ answer (no clear parallels)

Responding to Jesus’ teaching on the Greatest Commandment

Whose Son is the Messiah? (22:41-45)

The question Jesus brings

The context of Psalm 110 (echoes in the book of Hebrews)

The typical answer that Jesus sets aside

The redefining of the Messiah in Jesus

Responding to the identity of Jesus


Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper in one or more of the following ways:

  • Memorize Matthew 22:37-40
  • Dig deeper into this theme of love for God and love for others by reading 1 Corinthians 13 or 1 John (the entire book). What do these portions of Scripture tell you about God’s love and the calling to love others?
  • Read Psalm 110 or the epistle of Hebrews to more deeply understand how Jesus comes as the answer to all Israel’s messianic longings.
  • Consider reading Scot McKnight’s book The Jesus Creed for a deeper dive into Jesus’ distinctive teaching on the greatest commandment.

Say Who He Is: a prayer reflection on the names of Jesus

“He pressed them, ‘And how about you? Who do you say I am?'” (Matthew 16:15)

Savior. Messiah. Son of the Living God.
More than a book or words upon a page,
You are the Word—creating, sustaining, and naming.

Transcendent One, ineffable in glory, wrapped in light
and shrouded in clouds, upon whom we cannot look.
yet also Immanent One, closer than our thoughts and desires,
incarnate in flesh and bone—Immanuel.

I AM—the One who is—
is the Bread of life, is the Light of the world,
is the Good Shepherd and the Gate for the sheep,
is the Vine, is the Resurrection and the Life,
is the Way, the Truth, and the Life—
the One who makes me who I am, who I was,
and who I am becoming.

Peace-Giver and Contentment-Provider.
Spirit-Sender and Soul-Satisfier.
The Beginning and the Ending.
The Crucified Lamb of God who takes away our sin
and the Victorious King who tramples the serpent’s head.

The Love of our souls with an everlasting love
and the Refiner of our lives with a purifying flame.
The One through whom all things were created
and the One before whom all things will worship.

You are Jesus, the Savior, the Messiah, the Son of the Living God.

Living with Joy

This past weekend at Eastbrook, we continued our preaching series entitled “Joy Appears,” which continues our celebration of Christmas and the joy that has appeared in Jesus our Messiah and Savior. In this second and final week of the series I take us through speedy exploration of themes of joy in Paul’s epistle to the Philippians. There is so much here!

You can find the message video and outline below. You can also view the entire series here. Join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Rejoice in the Lord always. I will say it again: Rejoice!” (Philippians 4:4)

What is Joy?

A definition of joy

The difference between happiness and joy

Living with Joy in Prayer (Philippians 1:3-8)

Cultivating joy through prayer

Cultivating joy through gratitude for others 

Living with Joy Because of the Gospel (Philippians 1:12-18; 2:19-30)

Experiencing joy in the Gospel we have received

Experiencing joy as the Gospel is proclaimed (even through wrong motives)

Experiencing the joy of the Gospel in us and through others 

Living with Joy in Relation to Others (Philippians 2:1-4)

Cultivating joy in the imperfect Christian community

Cultivating joy as God makes us more like Jesus

Living with Joy Beyond Circumstances (Philippians 4:4, 10-13)

Choosing joy 

Choosing joy amidst trials 


Dig Deeper:

This week dig deeper in one or more of the following ways:

  • Memorize a verse from Philippians that stood out to you from this study. Write it on a notecard or make it your smartphone or computer background so you see it regularly.
  • Set aside some time in prayer this week where you will specifically express gratitude to God. You may want to write things down as you pray so you remember what you’re thankful for afterwards.
  • Express your appreciation or gratitude verbally or in written form to someone this week, whether a family member, a friend, a roommate, a classmate, or a work colleague. 

Jesus the Joy-Bringer

This past weekend at Eastbrook, we began a new preaching series entitled “Joy Appears,” which continues our celebration of Christmas and the joy that has appeared in Jesus our Messiah and Savior. In this first week of the series, Pastor Nic Fridenmaker explores how Jesus brings joy in His birth and ministry. What is joy? How does Jesus really bring joy? How is this different from manufactured joy? How can we experience joy in Jesus?

You can find the message video and outline below. You can also view the entire series here. Join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“An angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were terrified. But the angel said to them, “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news that will cause great joy for all the people..”  (Luke 2:9-10)

A Little History Lesson

Christmas

Epiphany

A Little Language Lesson

Happiness

Joy

A Big Announcement

Matthew 2:1-12

Luke 2:1-15

Joy then, and joy now.

Fear

Joy

Community


Dig Deeper:

This week dig deeper into Joy:

  • Watch this video again, and as we celebrate the Christmas Season, find ways to share Joy with those around you: https://bibleproject.com/explore/video/chara-joy/
  • Memorize on Isaiah 51:11.
  • The Gospel brings “great joy to all people.” Share the gospel this week in a tangible way. 
  • Merry Christmas!