30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World (2021)

The Muslim celebration of Ramadan began on Monday, April 12, and concludes 30 days later on May 11, followed by celebratory feasting. Every year we encourage our church to prayer for the Muslim world during this time. We have found this to be a great opportunity to cultivate intercessory prayer for those who do not yet know Christ, greater love for Muslims, and a better understanding of Islam.

I am so thankful for the outstanding resource developed in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World. There is both a print booklet for adults and one developed for kids.

https://vimeo.com/263358279/df12998267

If you are interested in understanding Islam further, please explore the following resources:

The Weekend Wanderer: 7 July 2018

The “Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly post in which I gather a smattering of news, stories, resources, and other media you could explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

82668“The 2018 CT Pastors Book Recommendations: Six recent books that will aid you in your ministry.” – I have read two of the six books on this list, and only really enjoyed one of them. However, I am always eager to hear of resources that have helped others in ministry recommended by those who are in ministry. Thanks to CT Pastors for sharing this list.

 

658.attachment-3“Eating as Discipleship” – In a review of Lisa Graham McMinn’s new book To the Table, Jeffrey Bilbro looks at the rising interest in food and how it may relate to our life as disciples of Christ. “The social architecture of the developed world encourages us to imagine food as a fuel that we consume….Lisa Graham McMinn’s To the Table: A Spirituality of Food, Farming, and Community joins a chorus of other books that call Christians to resist this consumerist view of food. McMinn’s book begins with Leslie Leyland Fields’s proclamation that “food is nothing less than Sacrament.”

 

062718-iwmf-church-030-copy-1681720abc42d6fa795cab36ff420ab41add3b90-s700-c85“For Some Gang Members In El Salvador, The Evangelical Church Offers A Way Out” – NPR offers a unique look at how evangelicals in El Salvador are reaching out to gang members and showing the opportunity of a better life. “In  [José Miguel] Cruz’s research, more than half of the Salvadoran gang members he surveyed identify as evangelicals and attend church services an average of 15 times a month. In contrast, just 17 percent of gang members identify as Catholic. ‘They feel the evangelicals are more welcoming despite their criminal past. And they feel embraced in these conversions by the [evangelical] church,’ he says.” [Thanks to Skye Jethani for sharing this.]

 

82688“Brazil’s Soccer Stars Love Jesus. Not Everybody Loves Their Christian Celebrations” – For all the World Cup fans out there: “In Brazil, the country of football, the relationship between religion and the soccer ball is old. Athletes have long played with crucifixes, medals of saints, or wrist tapes honoring the deities of the local Candomblé cult. But in recent years, explicit evangelical expressions of the faith in Christ have dominated the sporting scene. Perhaps not surprising in a country where nearly 25 percent of the population is Protestant, Brazil’s national team prays before and after games and celebrates goals by displaying T-shirts with Christian messages. At least six athletes on the current national team playing in this summer’s World Cup have declared themselves evangelical, including Fernandinho, Thiago Silva, Alisson, Douglas Costa, Willian and its star, Neymar.”

 

Wilson“In a Strange Land” – The inimitable John Wilson reviews Matthew Kaemingk’s Christian Hospitality and Muslim Immigration in an Age of Fear over at The Weekly Standard. While citing some frustrations with the book, Wilson makes a strong statement about its timeliness and value. “Kaemingk’s book should move to the top of the reading list for participants in four distinct but often overlapping conversations: (1) on Christian-Muslim interaction generally, post-9/11, and the “framing” of this subject in the West; (2) on Muslim immigrants to the United States; (3) on the “hegemony” of liberalism in modernity; and (4) on Abraham Kuyper’s theological case for genuine pluralism.”

 

75683“Learning from a Legend: 2 life lessons we can learn from Gardner C. Taylor” – In an inspiring article drawn from his book on Gardner C. Taylor, Jared Alcántara highlights two traits of this outstanding preacher that today’s preachers would do well to emulate: caring more about faithfulness than success and emphasizing the greatness of the Gospel more than the greatness of the preacher. As quickly as that and I’ve added Alcántara’s book to my reading list.

 

Screen Shot 2018-07-02 at 9.49.13 AM“How Great Is Our God (World Edition)” – I was speaking with some students at CRU’s Inner City summer experience this past Sunday night on multi-ethnic ministry in cities when someone shared this video with us afterwards. This is a version of “How Great Is Our God” that we often sing at Eastbrook Church, however, I had never seen this video before.

 

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World (2018)

30-days-adult-cover-2018.jpg

The Muslim celebration of Ramadan begins tomorrow on Tuesday, May 15. Every year we encourage our church to prayer for the Muslim world during this time. We have found this to be a great opportunity to cultivate intercessory prayer for those who do not yet know Christ, greater love for Muslims, and a better understanding of Islam.

I am so thankful for the outstanding resource developed in 30 Days of Prayer for the Muslim World. There is both a print booklet for adults and one developed for kids.

If you are interested in understanding Islam further, please explore the following resources:

Loving Our Muslim Neighbors

These last couple of days have seen some terrible events in Libya, as well as ongoing tensions directed against the US around the Muslim world. As I reflected on this turn of events this morning, I was reminded of Jesus’ statement that the greatest commandment is fulfilled in loving God with all of who we are and loving our neighbor as ourselves. It is difficult to love our neighbor when terrible things happen, yet the call of Christ is the same.

There is a profound word for our day about this within The Cape Town Commitment of the Lausanne Movement. At the beginning of section IIC in the “Call to Action” for the world, we read the words included below. In light of these past few days, and the anger directed at our country, what does it look like to live these things out?

1. ‘Love your neighbour as yourself’ includes persons of other faiths

In view of the affirmations made in The Cape Town Confession of Faith section 7 (d), we respond to our high calling as disciples of Jesus Christ to see people of other faiths as our neighbours in the biblical sense. They are human beings created in God’s image, whom God loves and for whose sins Christ died. We strive not only to see them as neighbours, but to obey Christ’s teaching by being neighbours to them. We are called to be gentle, but not naïve; to be discerning and not gullible; to be alert to whatever threats we may face, but not ruled by fear.Read More »

Encountering the World of Islam

This Fall we will be hosting Encountering the World of Islam at Eastbrook Church. I am thrilled that we can in some small way be a part of this great experience. Here is a description of the class taken from the web-site:

Encountering the World of Islam is a twelve lesson course which combines typical learning assignments with experiential activities and on-line interactions for an integrated learning environment. Each course lesson is taught by a different Muslim or Christian expert. In each lesson you will explore the Muslim world and God’s plan for Muslims by reading from a collection of writings about the life of Muhammad, the history of Islamic civilization, Islamic beliefs, Muslims today, and the everyday lives of Muslims from Morocco to Indonesia. Gain insight into diverse Muslim cultures and worldviews as well as Christian outreach toward Muslims, our response to Islam, and prayer for the Muslim world. The course textbook has more than 80 authors providing a broad range of perspectives on Islam.

Join us for the kick-off class this Sunday, September 9, from 5-8 PM at Holy Grounds Cafe. The first class is free, but the cost to enroll in the entire class is $250. You can sign-up online or take a look at the class brochure here.

Come join us!