Eastbrook at Home – September 27, 2020

Eastbrook-At-Home-Series-GFX_16x9-Title

Join us for worship with Eastbrook Church through Eastbrook at Home at 8, 9:30, and 11 AM as we continues our five-week series “The Kingdom of God.” This weekend I explore what it means to live our citizenship in the kingdom of God in light of our citizenship within earthly nations and kingdoms. Follow along with the entire series here. Access the downloadable bulletin, sermon notes, and sermon discussion guide here.

You can also join in with a daily devotional for this series here.

We also continue in-person services at both 9:30 and 11:00 AM this weekend at the Eastbrook Campus, but you do need to RSVP ahead of time this week and in coming weeks. Find out more info here.

Each Sunday at 8, 9:30, and 11 AM, you can participate with our weekly worship service at home with your small group, family, or friends. This service will then be available during the week until the next Sunday’s service starts. You can also access or download the service directly via Vimeo or the Eastbrook app.

If you are not signed up for our church emailing list, please sign up here. Also, please remember that during this time financial support for the church is critical as we continue minister within our congregation and reach out to our neighborhood, city, and the world at this challenging time. Please give online or send in a donation to support the ministry of Eastbrook Church.

Eastbrook at Home – September 20, 2020

Eastbrook-At-Home-Series-GFX_16x9-Title

Join us for worship with Eastbrook Church through Eastbrook at Home at 8, 9:30, and 11 AM as we continues our five-week series “The Kingdom of God.” After the past two weekends where we explored the theme of the kingdom of God in the Old Testament and the New Testament, this weekend I explore what it means to live in the kingdom of God by the power of the Holy Spirit. Follow along with the entire series here. Access the downloadable bulletin, sermon notes, and sermon discussion guide here.

You can also join in with a daily devotional for this series here.

We also continue in-person services at both 9:30 and 11:00 AM this weekend at the Eastbrook Campus, but you do need to RSVP ahead of time this week and in coming weeks. Find out more info here.

Each Sunday at 8, 9:30, and 11 AM, you can participate with our weekly worship service at home with your small group, family, or friends. This service will then be available during the week until the next Sunday’s service starts. You can also access or download the service directly via Vimeo or the Eastbrook app.

If you are not signed up for our church emailing list, please sign up here. Also, please remember that during this time financial support for the church is critical as we continue minister within our congregation and reach out to our neighborhood, city, and the world at this challenging time. Please give online or send in a donation to support the ministry of Eastbrook Church.

The First Day

On the first day of the week, very early in the morning, the women took the spices they had prepared and went to the tomb. (Luke 24:1)

the first day:
walking with heavy loads and burdened hearts
to the place His breathless body lay.
every hour seemed so still
since that dark day.

but now, the first day:
their hesitating procession to the tomb
finds the place, but not Him;
and aching emptiness
meets anger’s anxiety.

yet, on the first day
two men send shivers of loud light
mingled with a message:
‘He’s alive like a new day’s dawning!’
and they remember His words.

this first day is the third day
that sends the dark day running.


This is the seventh in a group of seven original poems composed for Holy Week, including:

Free to Live (discussion questions)

We continued our series, “Free: A Study on Galatians,” this past weekend at Eastbrook Church look at what it means to live in light of new life in Jesus Christ from Galatians 6. Here are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Free to Live,” which is the sixth and final part of our series.

Discussion Questions:

  1. This week we conclude our series Free: A Study on Galatians by looking at Galatians, chapter 6. Before you begin, pray that God would speak to you through your study of the Scripture. Next, read Galatians 6 out loud.
  2. The first part of Galatians 6, verses 1-10, continues Pauls train of thought begun in Galatians 5:13 about living by the Spirit. How does Paul practically instruct the Galatian believers about life in the Holy Spirit in verses 1-7? 
  3. Why do you think Paul brings together the ideas of carrying anothers burden and taking pride in ourselves in these verses?
  4. Have you ever struggled with pride when confronted with anothers sin or difficulties? What did you do?
  5. With verses 8-10, Paul confronts the tendency to take advantage of freedom in Christ for acts of the flesh (5:19). What does Paul call the believers toward in these verses? 
  6. Why do you think Paul includes phrases like let us not become weary or if we do not give up in the context of doing good deeds?
  7. How would you describe what it practically looks like to sow to please the Spirit (6:8) in our lives?
  8. In the second part of Galatians 6, verses 11-18, Paul summarizes and concludes the letter. He emphasizes  see what large letters(6:11)  the contrast between him and his opponents. What is that contrast and why is it important?
  9. What would you say Paul means by his strong statement in verse 14? What does that truth mean for you in your life?
  10. What is your biggest take-away from this study or the entire series on Galatians. If you are with a small group, discuss that with one another and pray for one another. If you are studying on your own, write it down and share it with someone this week.

The Resurrection: what does it mean to you?

I am the resurrection and the life. Anyone who believes in me will live, even though they die; and whoever lives by believing in Me will never die. Do you believe this? – Jesus (John 11:25-26)

The concept of resurrection is central to faith in Jesus Christ as the Messiah of God. We say that Jesus lived, taught God’s truth, died on the cross, and rose to life in victory over sin and death before ascending to the Father. Paul points out that just as Jesus was raised to life from death, all who believe in Him will also be raised to life after death (1 Corinthians 15:12-32). In another place, he writes that we all long “to be clothed with our heavenly dwelling” (2 Corinthians 5:4).

I’d like to hear from folks on what resurrection means to you.

  • do you believe in the resurrection or not? why?
  • how does Jesus’ resurrection from the dead change the way you live now and how you view death?
  • if there was no resurrection, what would it mean?

Talk amongst yourselves…