The Weekend Wanderer: 25 January 2020

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

 

gettyimages-527604357_custom-e2d96b35f284dfaaaabdf4c688bf48114e889b15-s1400-c85“Most Americans Are Lonely, And Our Workplace Culture May Not Be Helping” – There is an epidemic of loneliness in the United States that has been well documented for several years, but has reached a crisis point recently. Many point their fingers to technology or social media, but it may be that our work context, specifically relationships or lack thereof at work, are contributing to loneliness as well.

 

Pieter Brueghel - Tower of Babel“From context collapse to content collapse” – From Nicholas Carr: “Context collapse remains an important conceptual lens, but what’s becoming clear now is that a very different kind of collapse — content collapse — will be the more consequential legacy of social media. Content collapse, as I define it, is the tendency of social media to blur traditional distinctions among once distinct types of information — distinctions of form, register, sense, and importance. As social media becomes the main conduit for information of all sorts — personal correspondence, news and opinion, entertainment, art, instruction, and on and on — it homogenizes that information as well as our responses to it.”

 

114757“Kristie Anyabwile: When Women of Color Write, the Whole Church Gains” – “Over the years, Kristie Anyabwile has found herself returning to Psalm 119 during her daily devotions. ‘The psalm itself is full of reminders of the beauty and the benefits of God’s Word,’ she says. ‘It has always drawn me in. It not only encourages me, but it helps to whet my appetite more for God’s Word.’ It was during one of these times of personal study that she birthed the idea for His Testimonies, My Heritage: Women of Color on the Word of God. The multiauthor book—which received an Award of Merit in this year’s CT Book Awards—explores the 22 stanzas of Psalm 119 through exposition, essays, and poetry.”

 

Screen Shot 2020-01-24 at 8.28.57 AM“Beyond charity: How churches are helping food deserts” – Our church has been involved at different times and in different ways with trying to help with food security in our part of Milwaukee. We have a long way to go and have tried various methodologies, and are always looking for new ways to develop. I was encouraged to read this article about churches stepping beyond simple forms of help into more systemic approaches to resolving food deserts.

 

bonhoeffergandhi“Read the Letter Dietrich Bonhoeffer Wrote to Gandhi” – One of the most influential seasons of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s life and ministry came while he was studying in the United States at Union Theological Seminary. It was not necessarily the studies there that influenced Bonhoeffer, but his exposure to the African American community in Harlem and Abyssinian Baptist Church. Like Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Bonhoeffer was also influenced by Gandhi. A recently discovered, unpublished letter of Bonhoeffer to Gandhi reveals some insights into what Bonhoeffer was looking for in this figure from across the globe.

 

Screen Shot 2020-01-24 at 8.21.10 AM“Ian McKellen’s unearthed Lord of the Rings set diaries will take you there and back again” – While I am not always a fan of great books turned into movies, our family has a deep love for the The Lord of the Rings trilogy both Tolkien’s original writings and the movies directed by by Peter Jackson. Ian McKellen’s role as Gandalf is a stand-out, which shouldn’t surprise those of us who know McKellen first as a Shakespearian actor and later as a film star. I hope you enjoy these glimpses into McKellen’s journals while on the set of Lord of the Rings.

 

Music: Nils Frahm, “A Walking Embrace,” from All Encores.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

Distracted and Divided from the Good Life

Multicultural friends group using smartphone with coffee at university college break - People hands addicted by mobile smart phone - Technology concept with connected trendy millennials - Filter image

In an article entitled “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”, Nicholas Carr wrote:

Immersing myself in a book or a lengthy article used to be easy. My mind would get caught up in the narrative or the turns of the argument, and I’d spend hours strolling through long stretches of prose. That’s rarely the case any more. Now my concentration often starts to drift after two or three pages. I get fidgety, lose the thread, begin looking for something else to do.[1]

Studies have actually shown that not only are we becoming more distracted these days, but the power of distraction and multi-tasking are making us less productive in our work, more anxious, struggling with relationship-building, and often more lonely.[2]

Our Problem: Distracted from the Good Life

Our problem with distraction is that it divides us up, confuses us, and leads us away from life at its best. While we have more information than ever before, tremendous amounts of technology with greater capacities than ever before, and greater ease in life than ever before, we are simultaneously struggling as much as ever – if not more – with attaining to the good life.

The good life is that life the we would like to live; the life that we most desire and long for. Unfortunately, the good life seems to be slipping through our grasp even as we have more access to information and ease than ever before.

I’d like to take us some initial exploration of what it means to live life at its best; that is, how do we attain the life we really desire? This will require some degree of self-awareness. We will need to know our own selves well, and what is hindering us from the good life. Specifically, we will need to give attention to distraction, both the distractions that come from outside us and the distractions that come from inside of us

It will also require some God-awareness. Awareness of God is the key to the good life, specifically how to move from division to unity – or integrity – as people. Let’s look at Psalm 86:11:

Teach me your way, O Lord,
that I may walk in your truth;
give me an undivided heart
to revere your name.

Beginning with awareness of God will help us access the good life. Increasing our awareness of God as revealed in the Scripture, and preeminently in Jesus Christ, will lead us into transformative understanding of some basic truths. First, the good life is what we were made for. We were created by God, both individually and as the human race, for His good pleasure and for experiencing the good life with Him. Second, the only way to enter into the good life is through right connection with God. That right connection with God requires that our hearts that are focused upon Him through faith in Jesus Christ, and undivided by both inner and outer distractions. The good life requires undivided hearts with God. Over the next few weeks, i will spend some time here at the blog exploring these themes. I invite you to join me in that exploration.

 


[1] Nicholas Carr, “Is Google Making Us Stupid?”, The Atlantic, July/August 2008, https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/; accessed January 3, 2019.

[2] Eric Westervelt, “Learning in the Age of Digital Distraction,” NPR, November 5, 2016, https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016/11/05/498477634/learning-in-the-age-of-digital-distraction; accessed January 3, 2019; and Harriet Griffey, “The Lost Art of Concentration: Being Distracted in a Digital World,” The Guardian, October 14, 2018,  https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2018/oct/14/the-lost-art-of-concentration-being-distracted-in-a-digital-world; accessed January 3, 2019.