The Weekend Wanderer: 7 September 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

_108617739_chito_alamy976“The priest who survived the siege of Marawi” – This from the BBC in the Philippines: “For five months in 2017, Islamist militants took over the city of Marawi in the south of the Philippines. One of their prisoners was a Catholic priest, Father Chito, who was forced to make bombs under threat of torture. The experience shook him deeply, but he continues to hope Christians and Muslims will be able to live in peace.”

 

tom oden

“Paleo-Orthodoxy” – Shortly after college, but before attending seminary, I was encouraged to read Thomas Oden’s three-volume systematic theology (now condensed into a one-volume edition entitled Classical Christianity). When I did eventually read it, I found Oden’s approach toward outlining the ecumenical consensus around core Christian orthodoxy was probably as helpful as the content of the books. He sometimes referred to his efforts as “paleo-orthodoxy,” an attempt to retrieve the church fathers and mothers, as well as historic Christian statements of belief, for our present moment. Oden did not come to this place simplistically, but only after having meandered his way through the most liberal currents of modern and post-modern Christianity as a professor of theology at Drew University. I was discussing all of this with a friend this past week, and then came across this 2015 review of Oden’s memoir, A Change of Heart. Tom Oden passed away in 2016, but his framework for thinking about Christian theology continues to shape my own thinking, and for that I am very thankful.

 

Edgardo Bartolome“After Decades-Long Immigration Fight, A Chicago-Area Family Says Goodbye To Its Matriarch” – From WBEZ in Chicago: “Julie, 66, and Edgardo, 64, were — as Aaron describes them — ‘a unit.’ They were always together. She would garden while Edgardo mowed the lawn. They’d pray together in the living room, sometimes for hours. They’d watch YouTube clips of Filipino music shows together. They’d minister to the sick and dying at Filipino Immanuel Baptist Church on Chicago’s Northwest Side, where Edgardo is a part-time pastor.”

 

Philip Jenkins“Shifting Images of Terror: The Road from Arlington Road” – Here is Professor Philip Jenkins trying to help us recover historical memory in relation to how we think about acts of terror. Partly aimed at giving us context for our current troubles, Jenkins also helps us realize that the story we tell about our troubles shifts over time in ways that may be surprising and troubling.

 

aerial view of boat“Paul Says to ‘Be Filled with the Spirit.’ How Do We Obey a Passive Verb?” – This coming weekend at Eastbrook Church, I am preaching on what it means that the church is activated by the Holy Spirit. While not directly referencing this article by Andrew Wilson, I appreciated reading it in preparation for my message, particularly the analogy he utilizes in this article on being filled with the Holy Spirit. This is something I tried to address in a message this summer from the same passage in Ephesians, “A Crash Course in Christlike Living.”

 

Miles David deep blue trumpet“Jazz Legend Miles Davis’ Trumpet Hits Auction at Christie’s” – I grew up playing piano and trumpet. When I was in high school, I learned to play jazz on both instruments. I learned to love listening to some of the greats, even trying to learn from them how to play well. One of those great was Miles Davis, whose body of work holds such a breadth of musical stylings that it is difficult to become bored listening to his work. Davis musical style was nearly as matched by his aesthetic style, which included the design of his trumpets. Apparently, it’s not too late to own a piece of his legacy.

Music: Thelonious Monk, “‘Round Midnight,” performed by Miles Davis Quintet from ‘Round About Midnight.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 2 February 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

86016“Philippine Church Bombing Kills 20 After Vote for Muslim Governance” – “Filipino Christians are mourning at least 20 churchgoers and soldiers as martyrs after terrorists attacked a Catholic cathedral during Sunday mass in a heavily Muslim island in the southern Philippines. Two bombs went off at Our Lady of Mount Carmel in Jolo within minutes, the first blasting through rows of pews and the second shooting from the entrance to kill scrambling parishioners as well as the guards positioned outside to protect the church week after week.”

 

asiabibipakistan“Pakistan’s Supreme Court Upholds Christian Woman’s Blasphemy Acquittal” – From NPR: “On Tuesday, Pakistan’s Supreme Court upheld its acquittal of a Christian woman who had been sentenced to death for blasphemy in 2010, clearing the way for her to leave the country as radical Islamists seethe. Asia Bibi, a mother and illiterate farmhand of Christian faith, spent eight years on death row, until the country’s top court acquitted her last October, sparking massive protests across Pakistan.”

 

Aleksandr_Solzhenitsyn_1974b“Aleksandr the Great” – John Wilson reflects on the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s legacy, one-hundred years after his birth on December 11, 1918. Wilson writes: “It would have been much better for Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s posthumous reputation if the KGB had killed him just before or shortly after he was expelled from the Soviet Union in February 1974. Had that happened, he would have been a figure like Martin Luther King, Jr., whose birthday we have just celebrated: above criticism, a martyr of sorts.”

 

theyearofourlord1943“The Year of Whose Lord?: Let’s not expect too much of (Christian) humanism” – At Comment, Chad Wellmon reviews and respond to one of my favorite books of 2018, Alan Jacobs‘ In the Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis. Wellmon provides a valuable look at an alternative take on Christian humanism from the figures of Jacobs’ book (W.H. Auden, T.S. Eliot, C.S. Lewis, Jacques Maritain, and Simone Weil) in the form of Swiss theologian Karl Barth.

 

weight“Self-Control, the Leader’s Make-or-Break Virtue” – In light of the challenging array of pastoral failure over the last few years, Drew Dyck’s essay about the need for self-control in leadership is right on time. “Self-control is essential for every Christian. But as Strachan observed, for leaders the stakes are especially high. It’s no wonder Scripture lists self-control as a qualification for church leaders (Titus 1:8; 1 Tim. 3:2), describes it as a fruit of the Spirit (Gal. 5:25), and likens a person without it to “a city broken into and left without walls” (Prov. 25:28).”

 

walterrauschenbush“When Christian Evangelicals Loved Socialism” – The title might stir enough trouble in itself, but Peter Feuerherd’s examination of a unique time in the early twentieth century is worthwhile because this historical precedent is on the rise in some evangelical circles in our own day. Whether modern evangelicals would embrace Feuerherd’s definition of evangelicalism is debatable, but the article is still worth the read. “Walter Rauschenbusch, a Baptist pastor ministering to the poor on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, proposed an evangelical viewpoint that strongly embraced socialist ideals. During an 1891 trip to Germany, Rauschenbusch began formulating his view of the Kingdom of God, a concept that Jesus in the Gospels regularly refers to. Often, Jesus’s teaching is seen as referring to the afterlife, but Rauschenbusch and other Social Gospel thinkers saw it as relevant to contemporary times. Rauschenbusch promoted the idea that Christians needed to transform society to favor the poor and the oppressed.”

 

nancypelosigalencarey“Pelosi praises evangelicals in address to Christian college presidents, cites Matthew 25” – Not exactly the headline I expected to see, but a conversation hosted at the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) Presidents’ Conference involving both Betsy DeVos and Nancy Pelosi is fascinating in itself.  The conversation involves education, health care, immigration, and so much more. One of my former bosses, Galen Carey, of the National Association of Evangelicals, appears at one point as well.

In[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]