The Weekend Wanderer: 23 February 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

Richard Mouw“Richard Mouw Wrestles with Evangelicalism, Past and Present”Richard Mouw, is an elder statesman of evangelicalism, serving as an editor for numerous journals and a past president of Fuller Theological Seminary. Coming from the Reformed wing of evangelicalism, Mouw has been a strong voice for cultural engagement over the years. Tish Harrison Ward reviews his book, Restless Faith: Holding Evangelical Beliefs in a World of Contested Labels, at Christianity Today. “The book wrestles with questions of identity: What is this ever-changing movement called ‘evangelicalism?’ How do we deal with conflict over the meaning of this term and over the direction of the movement itself? And should we even use the ‘E-word’ anymore?”

 

science of miracles“The Science of Miracles” – Barbara Bradley Hagerty explores the science of miracles in this fascinating article that gives ample space for further consideration of how the science of faith and the faith of science interact. “But does that mean transcendent experiences are only a physiological event? Or, is this how the brain is wired to connect with a dimension of reality that our physical senses cannot perceive — in other words, does the brain activity reflect an encounter with the divine? I want to propose that how you come down on this issue depends on whether you think of the brain as a CD player or a radio.” You’ll have to read the rest of the article to discover what she means. [Thanks to Danny Clayton for sharing this article with me.]

 

89402“Our Churches Are Either Sacramental or Charismatic” – Andrew Wilson makes a case for the complementary value of both sacramental and charismatic traditions coming together in local churches. “There are, in other words, churches that are eucharistic and churches that are charismatic (as well as a good many churches that are neither). So it is interesting that the New Testament church about whose corporate worship we know the most, namely the church in Corinth, was both. The Corinthians were apparently unaware that those two strands of Christian worship were incompatible, and they happily (if somewhat erratically) pursued sacramental and spiritual gifts at the same time.”  Given my roots both in Anglicanism and the charismatic renewal, I have a lot of sympathy for Wilson’s case here and in his book Spirit and Sacrament.

 

89467“Making the Liturgy Sing a New Song” – “In 2015, when retired Anglican priest Nelson Koscheski shared one of his religious poems with the young music director at his Anglican church in Dallas, he never expected the poem to become a folk song. Koscheski thought the poem, which is about the Transfiguration, might make a good hymn, but would probably end up like most of his others—glanced at perfunctorily and then disregarded. But the music director, Ryan Flanigan, was so moved by the poem’s beauty that he set it to a simple folk tune, which he incorporated into the church’s Transfiguration Day service.”

 

new tolkien film“‘Tolkien’ Trailer: Fox Searchlight Biopic Stars Nicholas Hoult As ‘The Lord Of The Rings’ Author” – In case you didn’t know about it, there is forthcoming biographical movie on the life of J. R. R. Tolkien, creator of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. “The biopic follows the author through a hardscrabble childhood, into the battlefields of WWI and through the corridors of academia where he studied linguistics but eventually became a historian of the unreal.”

 

maxresdefault“Historic Vatican summit on clergy sexual abuse begins” – “Pope Francis began an unprecedented summit in Rome to confront the Catholic Church’s clergy abuse scandal by saying that Catholics are not looking for simple condemnation, but concrete actions. ‘In the face of this scourge of sexual abuse perpetrated by men of the church to the detriment of minors, I thought I would summon you, the Pope told the nearly 200 Catholic leaders gathered in Vatican City, so that all together we may lend an ear and listen to the Holy Spirit … and to the cry of the small who are asking for justice.'”

 

JDG SBC.jpeg“Southern Baptists should investigate churches that cover up abuse, says SBC president” – “J.D. Greear, president of the Southern Baptist Convention, said the denomination’s Executive Committee should immediately investigate 10 churches named in a report by the Houston Chronicle and San Antonio Express-News, including Second Baptist in Houston — one of the largest churches in the SBC. If any churches were found to have covered up abuse and refused to mend their ways, Greear told a gathering of Southern Baptist leaders on Monday (Feb. 18), then the convention should consider removing them from the denomination, a process known as ‘disfellowshipping.'”

 

weiss-wh-auden“Why W.H. Auden Hated His Most Famous Political Poems” – W. H. Auden is one of the greatest poets of the twentieth century, and also one of the most interesting essayists of his time. Late in his life, Auden revised many of his poems, redacting some parts of his work that he thought no longer worthy of being read. In this essay, Michael Weiss explores why Auden negatively assessed his early political poetry.

 

16-HammondBrochure-featured“‘Hearing’ the Hammond Organ” – On the lighter and musical side of things, how about the Hammond Organ. “The Hammond Organ was the first electronic musical instrument to become commercially successful. Just two years after it went on sale in 1935, major radio stations and Hollywood studios, hundreds of individuals, and over 2,500 churches had purchased a Hammond. The instrument had a major impact on the soundscape of both popular and religious musical life in the U.S., but it has been largely ignored by electronic music historians.” [Thanks to Micah Mattix for sharing these last two articles in The Daily Prufrock.]

 

Music: Johann Sebastian Bach’s Matthäus-Passion (BWV 244), performed by Sir John Eliot Gardiner & The English Baroque Soloists.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 25 August 2018

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

 

16601.31670“Meet Presbyterian America’s First Licensed Black Preacher: No Happy Ending and a Warning for Today” – Darryl Williamson shares the atypical story of John Chavis, an 18th century black man who became the Presbyterian Church’s first licensed black preacher in what became the United States of America. His life experiences highlight the racial wrestling at the heart of our nation’s birth, as well as the conflicted legacy that Christianity has in “the new world.” While not engaging with some of the deeper structural issues at play, Williamson’s introduction to Chavis is worth a read.

 

library“Advice to My Former Freshman Self” – Although published awhile back, Jordan Hylden’s advice to his college freshman self is still as helpful and illuminating as ever. This is a good article to pass along to college students you know as they launch into life at university, regardless of where they find themselves. It reminds me of a list I have been building to share with my own son, Isaiah, as he begins his freshman year of college this coming week.

 

clergy collar“Statement of Catholic Theologians, Educators, Parishioners, and Lay Leaders on Clergy Sexual Abuse in the United States” – There is a grassroots movement within the Roman Catholic church responding with angst to the recent report of the Pennsylvania Attorney General about the prevalence of sexual abuse in dioceses of that State. “The document chronicles, with nauseating clarity, seven decades of clergy sexual abuse and systematic cover-ups by bishops and others in positions of power. The report comes in the wake of last months’ revelations of decades of sexual predation by Cardinal Theodore McCarrick and in the long shadow of the sexual abuse crisis in Boston and beyond….Today, we call on the Catholic Bishops of the United States to prayerfully and genuinely consider submitting to Pope Francis their collective resignation as a public act of repentance and lamentation before God and God’s People.” Pope Francis has also written a letter responding to this situation, which you can read here.

 

Silhouette of a boy making Photos with smart phone“Phones Are Changing the Texture of Family Life” – The other day I told my son that I wanted to blow up all mobile phones. He actually agreed with me. Over at The Atlantic, Joe Pinsker reports on why we may have agreed based upon a recent, national Pew Research Survey that evaluates screen time and device distractions. “Ninety-five percent of Americans ages 13 to 17 have a smartphone or access to one, and nearly half report using the internet “almost constantly….Parents and teens alike felt that phones were encroaching on everyday interactions. Seventy-two percent of parents in the survey said that their teenagers were “sometimes” or “often” distracted by their phones during conversations. More interestingly, though, roughly half of teens felt the same way about their parents. The fact that this dynamic of distraction runs both ways is only just starting to get attention.”

 

82943“Prosperity Gospel Taught to 4 in 10 Evangelical Churchgoers” – This news report hit at the end of July, but I still wanted to share it. It’s worth reflecting on what this says about our local churches and American Protestant Christianity. “About a third of Protestant churchgoers say their congregation teaches that God will bless them if they donate money. Two-thirds say God wants them to prosper. One in 4 say they have to do something for God to receive material blessings in return. Those are among the key findings of a new study on ‘prosperity gospel’ beliefs from Nashville-based LifeWay Research, which surveyed 1,010 Americans who attend a Protestant or nondenominational church at least once a month.”

 

unite-the-right“Lived Theology a Year After Charlottesville” – The Project on Lived Theology under the direction of Charles Marsh at the University of Virginia put together an outstanding bibliography of articles following the tensions one year ago in Charlottesville. There are news pieces, theological reflections, summaries of religious responses, and forthcoming books about how the tensions in Charlottesville relate to the both the racial tensions and religious self-understanding of Christianity in America. It’s worth perusing this interesting collection.

 

Screen-Shot-2018-08-21-at-12.04.42-PM-554x419“For Millennial Conservatives, the Enemy is Us” – Rod Dreher vents his thoughts about conservatism mixed with generational theory. Like others, such as Alan Jacobs, I am a strong critic of generational thinking. Many times, it is perfectly useless. At other times, it is used as an excuse to blow off the thoughts of others who are “outdated.” Still at other times, it is used as a way to give oneself the platform of being “a spokesperson for my generation.” All that put aside, Dreher offers some insights for conservatives, with a few asides on Christianity, on the place in which they find themselves in this era.

 

SEVENTH SEAL, THE (1957)“Oh Lord, Why Did You Forsake Ingmar Bergman?: Reflections on a master at 100” – As the film world celebrates what would have been Swedish filmmaker Ingmar Bergman’s 100th birthday, I can tell there are going to be some outstanding reviews of his work. Nathan Shields offers a unique perspective on Bergman’s films as haunted by Lutheran faith even after Bergman declared himself an atheist. His films are, essentially, religious in nature, not merely philosophical, and it is this religious tension that often makes his films so powerful.

 

gray“Ode to Gray” – In light of discussing Bergman, this is as good a time as any to share Meghan Flaherty’s “Ode to Gray.” I have a confession: gray is one of my two favorite colors. Flaherty gives us a reason to feel good about gray. “I’m drawn to gray, as to a dream, but not to any old gray. Not storm-cloud gray or corporate monolith. I prefer tranquil gray: the undyed wool of sheep in rain, the mood inside a Gerhard Richter painting, the mottle of an ancient cairn. I don’t mean any one gray either but the entire underrainbow of the world, the faded rose and sage and caesious. Liard, lovat, perse. The human eye perceives five hundred—not a mere fifty—shades of gray. Paul Klee called it the richest color: the one that makes all the others speak.”

 

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]