Walking on Water

This past weekend at Eastbrook, Pastor Femi Ibitoye continued our preaching series, “Who Do You Say I Am?”, by looking at the eye-popping story of Jesus walking on water in Matthew 14:22-36.

This message is part of the sixth part of our longer series on Matthew, which includes “Family Tree,” “Power in Preparation,” “Becoming Real,” “The Messiah’s Mission,” and “Stories of the Kingdom.”

You can find the message video and outline below. You can also view the entire series here. Join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Then those who were in the boat worshiped him, saying, “Truly you are the Son of God.” (Matthew 14:33)

We cannot know God unless he reveals himself to us.

WHO IS JESUS IN THIS PASSAGE?

  • Jesus is the Son of Man.  (Matthew 14:23) He is a human being like us.  He depended completely on God.  Because he is human, he understand and sympathizes with our weakness.  He is the New Moses,  the great high priest. (Philippians 2:5-8, Hebrews 4:15)
  • Jesus is Lord.  (Matthew 14:25) Jesus is Lord over the seas and waves. He walks on water.  He is Lord over nature.  (Psalm 24:1; Psalm 29:2-3, Philippians 2:9-11). 
  • Jesus is the great “I AM (Matthew 14:27). Jesus’ self-revelation shows the source of his power.  Jesus is not a ghost, He is alive. (Job 9:8, Psalm 89:9, Revelation 1:17b-18)
  • Jesus is our Creator.  (Matthew 14:28-29). Jesus is so powerful that he can make ordinary men walk on water (Colossians 1:15-17).  He sustains us by his mighty hand. Defies gravity, science, logic and common sense.
  • Jesus is our Savior.  (Matthew 14:30). Jesus saves Peter from sinking.  He saves us too from sin and death.  Jesus’ name means, “Yahweh saves”.  
  • Jesus is the Son of God.  (Matthew 14:33).  Jesus is God.  Only God is to be worshipped. Jesus is worthy of our worship and praise.  (Psalm 96:9, Revelation 5:13-14)
  • Jesus is our Healer. (Matthew 14:34-36). All healing is because of Jesus.  Medical healing, physical healing, emotional healing, relational healing, spiritual healing are all because of Jesus.  (Psalm 30:2, Isaiah 53:5, Jeremiah 17:4)

Making it real

  • Worship Jesus
  • Have faith in Jesus
  • Prayer of Thanksgiving to Jesus

Dig Deeper:

This week dig deeper in one or more of the following ways:

  • Draw, paint, or ink this story of Jesus walking on water as a way of reflecting on what is happening and what you are learning about who Jesus.
  • Say a prayer of Thanksgiving today and throughout this week focusing on one or more of the titles of Jesus found in today’s text.  Praise him for “who He is.”

Jesus, Light to the Nations

As we continued our series “Power in Preparation” this past weekend at Eastbrook Church my good friend and colleague here at Eastbrook, Pastor Femi Ibitoye, explored Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness in Matthew 4:12-17. I appreciated the insights that Femi shared in this message, as well as the personal testimony he shared from his life about Jesus being the light.

You can view the message video and outline below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“The people living in darkness have seen a great light; on those living in the land of the shadow of death a light has dawned.” (Matthew 4:16)

Jesus, light of the world to the nations

  • Jesus is light to the gentiles
  • Jesus is the Light that overcomes the darkness (Matthew 4:16)
  • Jesus is King in this Kingdom (Isaiah 9:7)
  • All people (including the Gentiles) are invited into this Kingdom
  • All have sinned and must repent to enter it (Matthew 4:17)

What does the Light of Christ do?

  • It gives life
  • It sets people free from fear, darkness and death
  • It exposes sin and brings healing
  • It illuminates (provides wisdom and knowledge)
  • It provides direction and guidance

What should our response

  • Pray-Repent
  • Worship God- Like the Magi, 1 Peter 2:9, like Jesus mentioned in his temptation in Matthew 4:10, Deuteronomy 6:13
  • Reflect the light of Jesus. Matthew 5:16
  • Let the Word of God be a priority (Matthew 4:4, Psalm 119:105

The Way of the Wilderness

As we continued our series “Power in Preparation” this past weekend at Eastbrook Church my good friend, Will Branch, explored Jesus’ temptation in the wilderness in Matthew 4:1-11. I appreciated the insights that Will shared in this message, and I hope you are encouraged by it as well.

You can view the message video and outline below. You can follow along with the entire series here and the devotional that accompanies the series here. You could always join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil.”
Matthew 4:1

The Wilderness: Where will my provision come from?

The Wilderness: Where will my protection come from?

The Wilderness: Where will my praise go?

The Son of Man and the Hope of the Nations

The prophet Daniel speaks of both judgment and hope to a people exiled in foreign kingdoms. His prophetic oracles are situated within the exile in Babylon and the following Persian kingdoms.

In chapter 2, Daniel offers an interpretation of King Nebuchadnezzar’s dream of a giant statue made of different materials that is eventually struck by a giant rock that destroys it. Daniel tells of how one earthly kingdom will supplant another, tracing events we know from history after Daniel’s time. However, the culmination of Daniel’s interpretation—the stone that destroys this statue of kingdoms—he says represents God’s kingdom. These are his exact words:

“In the time of those kings, the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that will never be destroyed, nor will it be left to another people. It will crush all those kingdoms and bring them to an end, but it will itself endure forever.” (Daniel 2:44)

The theme of the vision is the humbling of earthly rulers because God is king and only God’s kingdom will endure through time, as it eventually supplants all other kingdoms.

Later in the book, in chapter 7, Daniel has a vision that has many similarities to this vision from Daniel 2. This time, however, the kings and kingdoms of earth are represented as ghoulish beasts that afflict the earth. Amidst this vision of terrifying vision, Daniel has a theophany—a vision of God—which puts perspective on the passing kingdoms of earth. In Daniel’s vision of God, there is a unique element, which connects with the messianic expectations of Isaiah:

“In my vision at night I looked, and there before me was one like a son of man, coming with the clouds of heaven. He approached the Ancient of Days and was led into his presence. He was given authority, glory and sovereign power; all nations and peoples of every language worshiped him. His dominion is an everlasting dominion that will not pass away, and his kingdom is one that will never be destroyed.” (Daniel 7:13-14)

This Son of Man figure surpasses all the earthly kings and kingdoms, even rising in victory over all the competing kingdoms that bring pain and corruption upon the earth. The Son of Man is the One who brings true hope, healing, and the kingdom of God upon earth. He is our hope, not the passing kings and kingdoms of earth.