Praying Like a Master

Art of Prayer Series Gfx_App WideI continue our series, “The Art of Prayer,” this past weekend at Eastbrook with a message entitled “Praying Like a Master” from Luke 11:1-13. Jesus is the Master of prayer, and if we want to truly learn about prayer then we must apprentice ourselves to the Master. When the disciples had spent enough time with Jesus, they asked Him, “Lord, teach us to pray” (Luke 11:1). With the disciples, we need to learn from Jesus’ essential teaching on prayer.

You can watch the message here, following along with the outline below. You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

 

The What of Prayer (Luke 11:1-4)

Addressing the Father

Declaring His Name and His Kingdom

Requesting what we need: provision, forgiveness, endurance

 

The How of Prayer (Luke 11:5-10)

With shameless audacity

By asking, seeking, knocking

 

The Who of Prayer (Luke 11:11-13)

The Father above all fathers

The Gift above all gifts

Making Space for Prayer

Art of Prayer Series Gfx_App WideThis past weekend at Eastbrook we began a new three-week series entitled “The Art of Prayer,” looking at Jesus’ approach to the life of prayer.

I began the series with a message entitled “Making Space for Prayer.” Jesus is the Master of prayer, and He makes space for prayer. We see this throughout the Gospel of Luke, and it comes clearest in Luke 5:16: “Jesus often withdrew to lonely places and prayed.” What does Jesus’ pattern of making space for prayer teach us about our own life of prayer?

You can watch the message here, following along with the outline below. You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

 

Beginnings of Prayer

The God who speaks (Genesis 1:3a)

 

The God who made us (Genesis 1:27)

 

The way we are made (Isaiah 43:21; Ephesians 2:10)

 

Desires, priorities, and making space for prayer

 

 

Jesus Makes Space for Prayer

Rhythm & Time (Luke 5:16)

 

Solitude & Silence (Luke 5:16)

 

Hearing What to Do (Luke 6:12-13a)

 

Hearing Who We Are (Luke 9:18)

 

The Art of Prayer: a series on Jesus’ life of prayer

Art of Prayer Series Gfx_App WideIt has been said that the greatest education in the world is watching a master at work. This is true whether we are referring to an artist, athlete, engineer, teacher, or anything else. We learn most from those who have developed mastery in that area. What about the spiritual life, specifically the life of conversation with God known as prayer?

Over the next three weeks at Eastbrook Church we will explore the life of our Master, Jesus, at prayer. In this new series entitled “The Art of Prayer,” we will specifically look at Jesus’ life of prayer in the Gospel of Luke. As we turn our eyes to Jesus, who is the Master of prayer, let’s see what we can learn from Him about the art of prayer.

You can follow along with the series via our web-site, our Vimeo page, our Facebook page, or by downloading the Eastbrook Church app.

Messy Ends

Flawed Heroes Series Gfx_App Wide
We concluded the “Flawed Heroes” series this past weekend at Eastbrook with a message called “Messy Ends.” this was an extended look at the “appendix of Judges, found in two shocking stories from Judges 17-21. I shared a list of five things we don’t need anyone’s help to accomplish when we do what’s right by our own estimation. I then outlined a series of five contrasting practices which enable us to put God as king in our corporate and individuals lives. You can watch the message here, following along with the outline below. You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

 

Five Things We Can Accomplish without a Leader’s Help (Judges 17-18; 19-21)

  1. Mixed-up Worship
  1. Mixed-up Relationships
  1. Mixed-up Morality
  1. Mixed-up Politics
  1. Mixed-up Goals

 

Five Practices to Recover Life with God as King

  1. God as King of our Worship (Ascribing Value in Worship)
  1. God as King of our Relationships (Living the Church as Family)
  1. God as King of our Morality (Holiness from the Inside)
  1. God as King of our Politics (Holiness Moving Inside-Out)
  1. God as King of our Goals (Giving Allegiance to God and His Kingdom)

 

The Bramble King: Abimelek

Flawed Heroes Series Gfx_App WideWhat happens when the leaders who present themselves to us offer false hope and peace?

This past weekend at Eastbrook I delved into that question as we continued our series, “Flawed Heroes” from the book of Judges looking at the life of Abimelek in Judges 9. Abimelek, whose name means ‘son of the king’, is the illegitimate son of Gideon (also, Jerub-Baal), one of the most well-known of the judges. The hopeful beginnings of Gideon’s life and service as a judge leads to 40 years of peace for the land, but his final days lead back into the failures of idolatry and injustice (Judges 8:27). Abimelek leaps forth from this place of corruption into a misconstrued sense of leadership soaked with evil and violence. Abimelek’s life leads us to ponder the statement: be careful what sort of leader you look for…you just might get it.

You can watch the message here, following along with the outline below. You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

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