MLK: ‘I Have a Dream’

dr-martin-luther-king-i-have-a-dream-speechOn this day celebrating Martin Luther King, Jr., I want to remind us of one of the unparalleled moments in his life and work.  While there is much that could be said about Martin Luther King, Jr., as a leader, orator, pastor, and husband, I want to encourage you today to simply read, listen to, or watch (below) the roughly seventeen-minute “I Have a Dream” speech that King gave over fifty years ago. The vision he articulated transcends his individual life and puts into eloquent words the deepest longings of many people then and now. This speech still rings with power, reminding us that, as he said, “Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning.” We have come so far but we still have so far to go.

Teaching

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This weekend at Eastbrook Church I continued our series, “Jesus on the Move,” with a messaged entitled, “Teaching” from Luke 6:17-49. This is Jesus’ famous sermon that has had such a tremendous impact on our world, even credited as one of the most important speeches in all of human history. I focused primarily on Jesus’ words about what it means to be blessed by God and the heart of His message about loving others.

You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

Also, join in with the weekday reading plan for this series here.

The Great Reversal (Luke 6:20-26)

“Blessed”

Contrasts of blessing and woe

The Son of Man at the center

 

The Radical Love of Jesus’ Disciples (Luke 6:27-38)

Radical love for enemies

Radical love with intent

Radical love reflecting God

Radical love free of judgment

 

3 Pictures of a Disciple’s Life (Luke 6:39-49)

Student and Teacher: the way

Tree and Fruit: the heart

Buildings and Foundations: the center

 

Sunday Prayer 35

in darkness the day begins,
lingering formless and void
before dawn.
come, Holy Spirit, come.
hover over the face of this day,
drawing divine life forth.
generate good things
from morning gloom
that Your light might shine
abroad in our hearts all day.

speak, Jesus the Word, speak.
show the way into this day
for Your words wield light
upon wild, wandering ways.
name Your works in us
that we might know the way to go,
for Your Name only is salvation.

stand, Father, stand.
Creative King, call forth life
and lead us alive to You.
All-powerful Lord, guide and guar us
as we sing salvation songs
on this pilgrim path.

[This is part of a series of prayers for Sunday worship preparation that begins here.]

Calling (discussion questions)

jesus-on-the-move-series-gfx_app-squareHere are the discussion questions that accompany my message, “Calling,” from this past weekend at Eastbrook Church. This is part of our series, “Jesus on the Move.” The texts for this week are from Luke 5 & 6.

Discussion Questions:

  1. We continue the series “Jesus on the Move” by looking at a series of stories about calling in Luke 5 and 6. Before we start ask God to speak to you from His Word.
  2. Read Luke 5:1-11 aloud. Jesus is by the Sea of Galilee (another name is ‘Lake of Gennesaret’) by Capernaum teaching a crowd the word of God from the boat of Simon Peter. What does Jesus ask Simon to do and why is this odd according to Simon’s response?
  3. What happens in 5:6-7 and what does it tell us about Jesus?
  4. Why does Simon respond the way he does and what does Jesus ask him to do? How does the event in boat relate to the work Jesus asks of Simon Peter?
  5. Now read Luke 5:27-32 aloud. Jesus visits the low-level taxman, Levi (also known as Matthew), and invites him to become a disciple. Why might this be shocking?
  6. Levi throws a party in Jesus’ honor and invites all his sinful friends. Why are some of the religious leaders upset with Jesus about this (5:30)?
  7. Jesus responds with a bold declaration about His life and mission in 5:31-32. What is the point of what Jesus is saying here?
  8. Why do you think religious people sometimes miss the point of Jesus’ mission?
  9. Now read the third episode, Luke 6:12-16, aloud. Here Jesus is calling a select group from within the large crowd of disciples to a specific role and purpose. What is it? Why is this important for Jesus?
  10. The life with Jesus is a journey of discipleship with defining moments along the way. What are 1 or 2 defining moments in your own journey with Jesus?
  11. What is one way God is calling you into a deeper life with Him through this study? If you are with a small group, discuss that with one another and pray for one another. If you are studying on your own, write it down and share it with someone.

  


 

Daily Reading Plan

To encourage us together in our growth with God, we are arranging a weekday reading plan through this entire series with the Gospel of Luke. As you read each day, ask God to speak to you from His word.

Follow along with the reading plan below, through the Eastbrook app, or on social media.

  • Jan. 9- Luke 5:1-11; Mark 1:16-20
  • Jan. 10 – Luke 5:27-32
  • Jan. 11 – Matthew 9:9-13; Hosea 6:4-6
  • Jan. 12 – Luke 6:12-16
  • Jan. 13 – Mark 3:13-19

Calling

jesus-on-the-move-series-gfx_app-wide

This weekend at Eastbrook Church I continued our series, “Jesus on the Move, “with a messaged entitled, “Calling” from Luke 5 & 6. I built this message around the two essential movements of discipleship: coming to Jesus and going with Jesus to others. This “come and go” movement is seen in Peter being caught and then catching disciples, Levi being socially and spiritually healed and then inviting others to the healing, and the apostles being called to Jesus and send out by Jesus to call others.

You can also follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

Also, join in with the weekday reading plan for this series here.

 

Caught and Catching (Luke 5:1-11)

The ignorant authority

The ordinary extraordinary

The commission

 

Healed and Healing (Luke 5:27-32)

The abrupt appointment

A banquet of outcasts

The declaration 

 

Called and Calling (Luke 5:11, 28; 6:12-16)

Leaving

Following

Going