The Weekend Wanderer: 14 March 2020

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.


CoronavirusCoronavirus – Public Health Informational Links – In the midst of all of the ever-changing updates on coronavirus and COVID-19, it is important to stay informed about what the virus is and what to do. I urge everyone to stay informed through the following resources:


masked girl to protect herself from wuhan virus in public area

Coronavirus – Church Resource Links – I have also come across a wide variety of resource links for churches who are trying to navigate this situation. Here are the resources pages I have found most helpful. If you have others, please feel free to post them in the comments for this post.


Eastbrook at Home Screen“Eastbrook at Home” – Like many other churches, we were forced to move our weekend services away from public gathering because of the declaration of a public emergency by our governor and the recommendation that events involving groups over 250 not meet. We have dubbed that online presence “Eastbrook at Home,” and it also includes links for further worship and discipleship at home resources. You are welcome to join us. We also have pulled together a page for congregational updates, including from our Medical Advisory Team, at “Health and Wellness Updates.”


1_QZDBZ9nV4EcpizDnCKKtMQ“Love in the Time of Coronavirus” – Andy Crouch offers a thorough and insightful look at how we can step forward to shape the culture at this unique time.”A leader’s responsibility, as circumstances around us change, is to speak, live, and make decisions in such a way that the horizons of possibility move towards shalom, flourishing for everyone in our sphere of influence, especially the vulnerable.” I view this as a must-read article for anyone with some sort of leadership presence. Justin Taylor offers a helpful summary of Crouch’s article in “A Guide for Christian Leaders in the Time of Coronavirus.”


Wuhan“Wuhan Pastor: Pray with Us” – I had not seen this letter written in January by an anonymous pastor from Wuhan, China, until I stumbled upon it recently when searching for something else. Given the way this situation has changed so quickly for us in the States, as well as around the world, I highly recommend reading this pastoral letter to believers in a time of crisis.


115964“Bethlehem Christians Bear Burden of Israel’s Coronavirus Crackdown” – “Visitors to Israel are now required to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival, according to safety measures implemented by the Israeli government in response to the global COVID-19 outbreak. The new policy has put a major dampener on Easter pilgrimages to the Holy Land—where 6 out of 10 tourists were Christians in 2018—dealing yet another blow to communities heavily dependent on foreign visitors.”


Music: Keith and Kristyn Getty, “Jesus, Draw Me Closer,” from In Christ Alone

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

Micah, part 1 [God in the Ruins]

God in the Ruins Series GFX_App Square

This past weekend at Eastbrook I continued our series on the message of the minor prophets, “God in the Ruins,” by looking at the first five chapters of the book of Micah.

Micah prophesied to both the northern and southern kingdoms during the reigns of kings Jotham (742-735 BC), Ahaz (735-715 BC), and Hezekiah (715-686 BC). He is mentioned in the book of Jeremiah as one who spoke during Hezekiah’s reign (Jeremiah 26:18). He witnesses the fall of Samaria and the northern kingdom in 722 BC, but also speaks about the coming exile for the southern kingdom, which happens after the time of his ministry. Micah hailed from Moresheth Gath, about 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem. His name literally means “Who is like Yahweh?” and his prophecies focus on both the doom coming upon a straying people and the hope that God will bring.

You can watch my message from this past weekend and follow along with the message outline below. You can also engage with the entire series on the minor prophets here or download the Eastbrook mobile app for even more opportunities to connect.

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Bethlehem by Over the Rhine

Advent and Christmas always plunge me back into music and poetry, mostly, I believe, because the wonder and mystery of the incarnation cannot be expressed merely in the language of explanation and logic. Instead, this mystery stumbles beyond our words into the leaping artistry of words and melodies to help us enter into the deepest places of what the Apostle Paul described as “the mystery of Christ, which was not made known to the sons of men in other generations as it has now been revealed to his holy apostles and prophets by the Spirit” (Ephesians 3:4-5). 

Over the RhineThe other day, I was listening through the album Blood Oranges in the Snow by the Cincinnati duo Over the Rhine. This is the third Christmas album they assembled and it still catches my imagination. Here is a song entitled “Bethlehem” from that album.

 

They write this about the song:Read More »