Canticles of Christmas – a new series at Eastbrook Church

This coming Sunday at Eastbrook Church we begin our journey of Advent as well as a new preaching series entitled “Canticles of Christmas.” This series explores the prayers found in the Gospel of Luke, chapters 1-2, as doorways into the celebration of Advent and key theological revelations of God’s plan in Christ.

Here are the weekly topics for this five-part series, which surrounds our celebration of Christ’s nativity on December 24 and December 25:

November 27 – “May It Be Unto Me As You Have Said” (Fiat Mihi) – text: Luke 1:26-38

December 4 – “My Soul Glorifies the Lord” (Magnificat) – text: Luke 1:46-55

December 11 – “Praise Be to the Lord” (Benedictus) – text: Luke 1:67-79

December 18 – “Glory to God in the Highest” (Gloria)- text: Luke 2:8-20

December 24 – “And His Name Shall Be Called…Mighty God”

December 25 – “He Will Be Called Immanuel”

January 1, 2023 – “Now dismiss your servant in peace” (Nunc dimittis) – Luke 2:22-38

Along with the weekend preaching series, we will also have a devotional that will run from Advent through Christmas to Epiphany. You can access the devotional here.

Future Hope

This past weekend at Eastbrook, I continued our series on 1 Thessalonians entitled “Hope Rising: 1 Thessalonians for Today.” This fourth week of the series I preached from 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11 on how belief that God holds the future brings hope into the way we live with God now.

You can find the message outline and video below. You can access the entire series here. Join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Brothers and sisters, we do not want you to be uninformed about those who sleep in death, so that you do not grieve like the rest of mankind, who have no hope.” (1 Thessalonians 4:13)

Grieving, but with Future Hope (1 Thessalonians 4:13)

The Thessalonian believers’ grief

The rest of humankind grieves without hope because without Christ

The importance of grieving – even Jesus at the tomb of Lazarus

God’s Truth About Future Hope (1 Thessalonians 4:14-18)

What we believe about Christ and ourselves (4:14)

The teaching of Jesus on this, summarized by Paul (4:15-17)

Encourage one another with this future hope (4:18)

Living Now with Future Hope (1 Thessalonians 5:1-11)

The reality of the “day of the Lord” (5:1-3)

The contrast of night and day, darkness and light (5:4-8)

The truth on which we build our hope for the future (5:9-10)Encourage one another and build each other up with this future hope (5:11)


Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper in one or more of the following ways:

Hope Rising: 1 Thessalonians for Today – a new series at Eastbrook Church

This coming Sunday at Eastbrook Church we begin a new preaching series entitled “Hope Rising: 1 Thessalonians for Today.” The past few years have brought many people to the edge of life, leading some to say we are dealing with a crisis of hope. How do we live in the face of a crisis of hope? One of the Apostle Paul’s earliest writings, 1 Thessalonians, brings us face to face with hope in Christ and what that means for life now and in the future. Over the course of five weeks, we will explore what it means to have living hope as we walk through 1 Thessalonians.

Here are the weekly topics for this five-part series:

October 23 – “Beginning with Hope” – text: 1 Thessalonians 1:1-10

October 30 – “Hope Together” – text: 1 Thessalonians 2:1-3:13

November 6 – “Holy Hope” – text: 1 Thessalonians 4:1-12

November 13 – “Future Hope” – text: 1 Thessalonians 4:13-5:11

November 20 – “Living Hope” – text: 1 Thessalonians 5:12-28

A Reset in Light of the End

This past weekend at Eastbrook, we concluded our four-week preaching series entitled “Reset.” I brought our attention to the final phrase of Hebrews 10:24-25: “and all the more as you see the day approaching.” There is much more going on at Eastbrook during this four weeks than a preaching series, so let me encourage you to find out more here.

You can find the message outline and video below. You can also view the entire series here. Join us for weekend worship in-person or remotely via Eastbrook at Home.


“Let us consider how we may spur one another on… and all the more as you see the Day approaching.” (Hebrews 10:24-25)

The Challenge of Time in Our Day

The challenge of coming to the end of life with regret

The reality of the end and Christ’s parousia

The challenge of time in the day when Hebrews was written

Reset on Time with Faith, Hope, and Love (Hebrews 10:24-25; 11:1, 13)

Living well in light of the end and the church as a community of character

Instant society and the warping of time: expectation of speed

Three Christian virtues: 

Love lives now in light of the future

Faith holds what is not seen 

Hope grasps the future yet to be realized

God forms these virtues within the Christian community through time

A Reset for the Long Haul (Hebrews 10:25; 9:27-28; 11:13-16; Revelation 22:20)

“All the more” perseverance until that day: “a long obedience in the same direction”

“All the more” attentiveness until that day: “Come, Lord Jesus!”

“All the more” anticipation until that day: “a better country” 


Dig Deeper

This week dig deeper in one or more of the following ways:

  • Memorize Hebrews 10:24-25.
  • Set aside space and time this week to reflect on the long haul of faith. Journal, pray, or discuss with another these questions/prompts:
    • What is most difficult for me about faith in the long haul?
    • What are the barriers that keep me from loving, serving, and meeting together over the long haul of faith?
    • Where do I most need to grow with God in this area? 
  • Watch the Bible Project video, “The Day of the Lord”
  • Read the essay, “The Day of the Lord,” by Jason S. DeRouchie

The God of Our Future

This weekend at Eastbrook Church, I continued our series entitled “What Is God Like?” with a message entitled “The God of Our Future.”

The sermon drew from the beautiful words found in Isaiah 65:17-66:24 about the new heavens and earth.

You can listen to my message online at the Eastbrook web-site here. You can also subscribe to the Eastbrook podcast here or follow Eastbrook Church on Twitter. The outline is below:Read More »