God of the Displaced Ones

Two weekends ago, I began a new series entitled “God in Blank Spaces.” The idea of this series is to connect our thinking about who God is as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit with what God does in our world. One question I pondered quite a bit is this: if God is who we say He is, then what does that mean for the world in which we live?

This past weekend, we had the privilege of hearing from Jenny Yang, Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at World Relief, as the first weekend in our missions festival, “God of the Displaced Ones.” Jenny is co-author with Matt Soerens of Welcoming the Stranger and was named by Christianity Today as one of five women change-makers in non-profit leadership today.

You can watch the video of Jenny’s message below and follow along with her sermon outline as well.

You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

 

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God of the Lost Ones

Two weekends ago, I began a new series entitled “God in Blank Spaces.” The idea of this series is to connect our thinking about who God is as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit with what God does in our world. One question I pondered quite a bit is this: if God is who we say He is, then what does that mean for the world in which we live?

There are places in our world where it seems like God is absent. There are peripheral places and marginal spaces where people are often forgotten, even by us. But they are not forgotten by God. In fact, the Scripture tells us again and again that God shows up in the blank spaces, the margins and the periphery. Because the love of God is at the heart of who He is, God is already standing in the midst of the blank spaces of our world. And He is inviting His people to join Him there.

Here is the video and sermon outline of the first message of this series, “God of the Lost Ones.”

You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

 

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Connecting for Christ: Paul in Athens

This coming Sunday at Eastbrook Church, I am preaching from Acts 17:16-34 about Paul’s ministry in Athens. I find this episode to be one of the most interesting stories in Acts because it is so unlike other examples from Paul’s ministry journeys.

Here are three observations I have been spending time thinking on:

  1. Paul doesn’t connect with a Jewish audience, as he does so many other times by starting his ministry in the synagogues.
  2. Paul does not use Scripture explicitly, but connects with his audience by quoting from philosophers and poets that were common to their setting.
  3. Paul does not condemn their apparent idolatry, but uses it as a springboard for proclaiming the good news in Christ.

There are so many more things that could be considered from this story, but I have been holding these thoughts in tension around the following question:

How can we find creative ways to connect with people and our culture around us in order to proclaim the message of Christ?

What do you think?