The Weekend Wanderer: 29 February 2020

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

Jean Vanier“Internal report finds that L’Arche founder Jean Vanier engaged in decades of sexual misconduct” – This was one of the most devastating headlines of the past week. If you are not familiar with Jean Vanier and L’Arche, I am sad that this would be your introduction. L’Arche has been a strong force in dignifying those with intellectual disabilities, helping others to see their gifts and creating environments where the disabled and non-disabled form communities together. Vanier has been an inspiration to many and influential through his speaking and writing, such as his book Becoming Human. Henri Nouwen famously left his teaching positions at Harvard and Yale to join a L’Arche community, which he references in Adam: God’s Beloved and In the Name of JesusHow do we come to terms with those we respect who have fallen? I recommend Marlena Proper Graves’ article “Don’t Let Jean Vanier (or Other Heroes) Off the Hook” as a way to reflect further on this.


115567“Chinese American Churches on the Frontlines of Coronavirus Vigilance” – “There has been no sustained community transmission of the coronavirus in the United States so far, and many Chinese churches such as Raleigh Chinese Christian Church (RCCC) are doing their best to keep it that way.  Taped to the entrance of the church’s glass doors is a yellow notice with the word ‘ATTENTION’ in capital letters. It warns parents not to bring their children to church if they’ve traveled to Asia in the past 14 days. Churches such as RCCC—a nondenominational congregation with services in Mandarin, Cantonese, and English—have taken it upon themselves to self-quarantine, in keeping with Centers for Disease Control guidance.


webRNS-Multiracial-Churches2-011620-1200x675“Multiracial churches growing, but challenging for clergy of color” – Our church has participated in discussions about multi-ethnic ministry for years, but we know we have not figured out everything (if anything, we sometimes think). Helpful catalysts in our growth over the years have been contacts we have made through various groups, including Mosaix, a relational network of pastors, churches, organizations, and denominations founded by Mark DeYmaz and George Yancey. Here is an article summarizing some of the important trends and lessons-learned from the most recent Mosaix conference in Keller, Texas.


30keller2-superJumbo“How Do Christians Fit Into the Two-Party System? They Don’t” – As I prepare for an upcoming series at Eastbrook on faith and politics, here’s an opinion piece by Tim Keller in The New York Times that someone brought to my attention this past week. Although I had not read Keller’s article before, he speaks to one of the key approaches to Christian political engagement that I often emphasize: if we find that one political party or one political system seems to perfectly align with our understanding of Christian faith, then we probably have a misapprehension of either the political party/system or the Christian faith. The kingdom of God has yet to be perfectly represented by any particular political party or system, thus giving us space to critique all of them as we stay rooted as citizens of heaven (Philippians 3:20).


Screen Shot 2020-02-28 at 8.11.16 AM“This Arctic Explorer Was One Tent Pole Away from Death” – I don’t know what it is but these sort of stories grip me every time. Drawn from his memoir, The Impossible First, Colin O’Brady recounts here in Outside some parts of his ground-breaking solo journey across Antarctica. “Alone with his thoughts for nearly two months in the vastness of the frozen continent—gripped by fear and doubt—he reflected on his past, seeking courage and inspiration in the relationships and experiences that had shaped his life.” Themes of solitude, perseverance, failure, fear, consequences, and choices rise up again and again.


MLK“Four Powerful Preaching Practices from Martin Luther King Jr.” – A few years ago, I listened through The Landmark Speeches and Sermons of Martin Luther King, Jr. From a historical perspective, I was fascinated by the development of themes and the earlier use of material that eventually became part of King’s famous “I Have a Dream” speech in Washington, DC. As a preacher, I learned a lot from King’s use of biblical texts and imagery, as well as his command of rhetorical devices. Here’s Lenny Luchetti at Preaching Today with an examination of preaching practices from King. “The preaching of Martin Luther King Jr. didn’t merely inspire a congregation, which would be no small task; it inspired a massive movement. It wouldn’t be a stretch to assert that King’s preaching was the primary, if not sole, initiator of social transformation in America through the Civil Rights Movement during the 1960s.”


Music: John Mark McMillan ft. Kim Walker-Smith, “How He Loves” (Live)

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 15 February 2020

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

Wright“Loving to Know” – N. T. Wright addresses the importance not only of what we know, but how we know.  Stepping into the divide between “subjective” and “objective” knowledge, Wright explores the ways in which not only his own discipline of New Testament studies has been impacted by this supposed distinction, but also our broader experience as religious beings. “The way out is an understanding of ­creation as the gift of love, to which love is the appropriate response. But we cannot reach that true understanding of ­creation by a direct approach, for it quickly leads us back to idols. We must start with the center of creation: Jesus himself.”

 

Walley, Thomas, 1817-1878; George Whitefield Preaching in Bolton, June 1750“The Political Captivity of the Faithful” – Here is Nathan Hatch, religious historian and President of Wake Forest University, on the way both conservatives and liberals are held captive to the politicization of our day. “Today, I look in vain for religious leaders whose theological convictions creatively bridge the chasm between conservative and progressive views of the world not for political reasons, but for religious ones. One regularly sees this point made about the conflation of evangelical and conservative values, but I think there is much the same pattern among mainline and progressive Christians. When mainline churches develop an agenda on social policy, it has typically gravitated to those issues, however worthy, that have been defined by others.”

 

Steve Timmis“Acts 29 CEO Removed Amid ‘Accusations of Abusive Leadership'” – It’s hard not to cry out when I read these articles, “Not again!” Lord, have mercy upon us. “As CEO of Acts 29, Steve Timmis was an effective and respected leader. During his seven years at the helm, the church planting network rebounded from the fallout around its co-founder Mark Driscoll and expanded from 300 mostly US churches to 800 around the world.A gray-haired British pastor with sharp Bible teaching and deep passion for mission, Timmis was known for the model of intensive gospel community developed at his 120-person church in the middle of England, The Crowded House. He emphasized ‘ordinary life with gospel intentionality.’ But while his international reputation grew, some who knew Timmis in his ordinary life—who prayed, fellowshipped, and evangelized with him in living rooms, offices, and pubs—saw a different side.”

 

DeGroat Narcissism“Narcissism is not a ‘leadership style'” – After that last article––and the apparent endless stream of similar stories––it’s probably as good an opportunity as ever to hear from Chuck DeGroat about narcissism in leadership. Speaking directly of Driscoll, Acts 29, and Timmis, DeGroat writes: “Let me be crystal clear: bullying, controlling, and scaring are not characteristics of any ‘leadership style’ I find worthy of ‘Christian” leadership. These descriptors do not remotely approach the character of a Jesus-following leader. These pastors described an abusive pastor and abusive culture.'”

 

Brooks - 5 lies“Five Lies Our Culture Tells: The Cultural Roots of Our Political Problems” – David Brooks addresses the deeper look at our political divides to address five core lies that our culture believes and lives by that are just, plain, wrong. Part of this material is drawn from Brooks’ book The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Life.

 

Ross Douthat“Back to the Future” – Peter Thiel reviews Ross Douthat’s new book, The Decadent Society: How We Became the Victims of Our Own Success, which critiques our prevailing sense of inevitable progress over the years. “Douthat outlines four aspects of decadence: stagnation (technological and economic mediocrity), sterility (declining birth rates), sclerosis (institutional failure), and repetition (cultural exhaustion).” You can read a summary of Douthat’s argument in “The Age of Decadence” at his regular column in The New York Times.

 

Music: L.S.U., “Blame,” from Grace Shaker.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 23 November 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

PastorJayandDerrick“A Tale of Two Churches” – I heard about this story from someone who described it as the most powerful story about Christianity so far this year. I wasn’t sure what that meant until I read this piece about two churches that merged together in the midst of great conflict. It is most definitely worth a read, and particularly moving, especially in our divided days.

 

Kidd - Who Is an Evangelical“‘Who Is An Evangelical?’ Looks At History Of Evangelical Christians And The GOP” – I was driving in the car the other day when I caught this piece on NPR on the nature of evangelicalism. I didn’t know who the interviewee was until the end of the piece when NPR’s Audie Cornish thanked Thomas Kidd, professor of history at Baylor University and author of the recent book Who Is an Evangelical?: The History of a Movement in Crisis. Kidd offers a balanced and insightful approach to what is often a simplistic political trope but is really much more diverse and complicated than often thought. You can read a review of his book here.

 

5944.large“How Garbage Collectors Can Refresh Our Theology” – Here’s Gustavo H. R. Santos at Comment helping us reframe vocation: “Our churches are full of both professionals and working-class labourers, so if we want to teach about work from a biblical perspective as part of our discipleship, we need a theology infused with a broader paradigm of labour. The experience of millions from the working class teaches us that being who Christ calls us to be doesn’t depend on the job we have. They remind us that we can’t control our circumstances and that faithfulness is more important than performance. So the question becomes, Are we willing to listen to what their lives are telling us? The ancient story of Ruth the Moabite might help improve our hearing.”

 

113985“Pastors & Burnout: A Personal Reflection” – Every pastor, as well as many others in serving professions, deal with the dangers of burnout. I have, and I have talked to many other pastors who have as well. Scott Nichols offers his perspective as a pastor who has served for over thirty years in three different churches. I appreciate the practicality of Nichols’ list, including things like staying active and cultivating friendships, because, in my experience, pastors have a tendency to over-spiritualize their burnout.  One of the areas I wish he would have addressed was the darker motivations that potentially lead us as pastors toward burnout, but this article is still worth the read.

 

Richard-Mouw-Missiology-Lecture“A ‘Middle Way’: Lessons for Faithfulness in the Public Square” – It is difficult to ignore all the noise in the political world these days, and it can leave us either wanting to retreat entirely or to becoming so sucked into it that little else receives attention. What does it mean as Christians to engage in the public square? Well, right on time, Richard Mouw, former President of Fuller Seminary, offers a suggestion about a “middle way” on this.

 

Screen Shot 2019-11-22 at 12.28.19 PM“Vexed and Troubled Englishmen: How should we remember the Puritans?” – The name “puritan” has received such a bad name in recent days, largely because of misunderstandings of what the name means and what the original intent of the Puritans as a group truly was. Andrew Delbanco reviews Daniel T. Rodger’s book, As a City on a Hill: The Story of America’s Most Famous Lay Sermon, which focuses on John Winthrop’s speech “A Model of Christian Charity.” “Rodgers’s book is not only a close reading of the reception and history of Winthrop’s speech but also a rescue operation for Puritanism itself.”

 

Music: DJ Shadow featuring Nils Frahm, “Scars,” from Ghost in the Shell (Music Inspired By the Motion Picture)

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 17 August 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

Marty Sampson“What could have helped Marty Sampson’s faith” – Some of you may have heard that Marty Sampson, well-known as a worship leader and song writer with Hillsong United and Hillsong Young & Free, announced that he is departing from his Christian faith. After pointing to the string of failures in ministry leaders and sharing some of his own doubts, Sampson says multiple times, “No one talks about it.” Aside from the fact that a lot of people talk about it, this raises multiple issues about the theological vacuity of much of evangelicalism, the inability of many churches to give space and guidance to people in moments of questioning or doubt, and also the lack of long-term growth mindset that gives space for ups and downs in much hyped-up contemporary worship-experience churches. Australian missiologist Michael Frost offers some meaningful insights in this article, with reference to the life of Thomas Merton: “In our information-drunk, effectiveness-addicted culture, finding genuine truth happens through the life-tested skill of gathering what is needed to sustain faith without killing faith in the gathering.”

I’d also encourage you to read Russell Moore’s article, “When Someone You Admire Abandons the Faith.He writes, “The Internet is atwitter with opinions on all of that, from atheists, from Christians, and everyone in between. As sad as I am about all of this, I can’t help but think about lots of people I’ve known, many of whom would never make headlines, who just, sometimes very quietly, walked away from the faith. ” Along with that, David French’s article on this issue, “Another Pop-Culture Christian Loses His Faith,” in National Review is painfully relevant: “I’m noticing a pattern in many of the people who fall away (again, only Sampson knows his heart): They’re retreating from faith not because they’re ignorant of its key tenets and lack the necessary intellectual, theological depth but rather because the adversity of adherence to increasingly countercultural doctrine grows too great.”

 

J D Vance Catholic“J.D. Vance Becomes Catholic” – At another point in the faith journey continuum, there is this news. J. D. Vance wrote the book Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis as a reflection on social challenges in our country, the struggle to find stability in life, and what it means to become a good person in spite of a difficult family upbringing. The book became a New York Times bestseller and is being made into a movie directed by Ron Howard. Rod Dreher reported this past week that Vance has converted to Roman Catholicism. Vance comments: “one of the things I love about Catholicism is that it’s very old. I take a longer view….The hope of the Christian faith is not rooted in any short-term conquest of the material world, but in the fact that it is true, and over the long term, with various fits and starts, things will work out.”

 

91727“Preaching Against Racism Is Not a Distraction from the Gospel” – Here is Esau McCaulley, assistant professor of New Testament at Wheaton College: “In light of recent gun violence, some of which appears to be racially motivated, the church’s response to racial controversy is once again in the spotlight. We have to ask ourselves: What will our testimony be? What do we do when violent events occur with such startling frequency that we don’t know what to do or what to say? How do know when it is wise to be silent or when it is necessary to speak? Pastors, in particular, have to ask: How do we use the pulpit to preach against racism?”

 

91744

“Does Your Preaching Touch Politics?” – And if that raised some questions about how the pulpit should engage with current issues, here is a 2008 article featuring Mark Dever, Adam Hamilton, Joel Hunter, and Efrem Smith on how they preach on political issues. While some aspects of it show their age, as we continue in a divisive climate in our society, advice from these seasoned pastors is worth the read.

 

NewYorker_Mosquito_Vertical_v5“How Mosquitoes Changed Everything” – We all dislike mosquitoes, but now there is an assembly of their great impact on human civilization. “Winegard finds first-person descriptions of death and suffering caused by mosquito-borne diseases in many eras. Florence Nightingale called the Pontine Marshes, near Rome, ‘the Valley of the Shadow of Death’; a German missionary visiting the southern United States wrote that it was ‘in the spring a paradise, in the summer a hell, and in the autumn a hospital’; a Mayan survivor of post-Columbus epidemics remembered, ‘Great was the stench of death. . . . All of us were thus. We were born to die!’ And yet human beings lived with, and died from, mosquito-borne diseases for thousands of years without understanding how they were reaching us. Not until the end of the nineteenth century was it scientifically established that mosquitoes transmitted malaria. Before then, the miasma theory, holding that fevers travelled independently, through fetid environments, held sway, reflected in the very word ‘malaria’: we thought we were the victims of ‘bad air.’ That these tiny biting insects might be affecting our lives so profoundly was a leap beyond imagining.”

 

_108333557_overallwinner_matbeetson_watermarked“In pictures: Australian Geographic’s photo prize winners” – The world is a beautiful place, and there are many parts to it that we will never be able to see in person. Thankfully, there are skilled photographers who can share unique views of God’s good creation with great skill and from fascinating angles.

 

bach-manuscript-well-tempered-clavier-prelude-no-1-1414409439-1-600x452“The Prelude” – Here’s Austin Kleon combatting violence with Bach. “I thought today that I was going to sit down and blog about violence, about how hard I am trying to cleanse my house of violence, how violence is not just guns and bombs and knives and fists, but how many kinds of touch can be violent, how words can be violent, how you can stab your salad violently….The only thing I feel like I can do is make my home a haven, a place where we celebrate things of beauty and rationality and love and peace. Bach’s music is one of those things.”

 

Music: J. S. Bach, “The Goldberg Variations,” performed by Glenn Gould (1955).

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 20 July 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

5779.thumb“Richard Rohr: A Field Guide” – When you’re a pastor you encounter trends within people’s spiritual conversations that make you wonder what is going on. When an author is referenced often in conversation, you have to pay attention. A number of years ago, authors like Rob Bell or Donald Miller were some of those sort of authors. These days, I can barely take ten steps without someone mentioning Richard Rohr. Love him or hate him, you have to reckon with Richard Rohr in discussions of faith. About two months ago, I was thinking of writing an engagement with Rohr, but didn’t get to it. Just in time, Matthew Milliner steps up to provide this helpful “field guide” to Rohr.

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-15 at 10.41.30 AM“In Brooklyn, ‘tradpunk’ Christianity meets millennial counterculture” – I didn’t see this one coming. Tara Isabella Burton writes about “a goth garden party in Brooklyn, New York’s historic Green-Wood Cemetery with a few people I’d met on the fringe corners of what the internet.” She reflects on millennial faith, her specific Anglo-Catholic tradition, and the countercultural nature of Christianity. “At its core, Christianity is a faith of resistance, of questioning dormant assumptions, of breaking apart easy cycles of power and consumption. It’s been a faith of strangeness: and of strangers in a strange land. For me, at least, the addition of incense, or the old Rite 1 Liturgy, helps to highlight that strangeness. Keeping theology Weird is key to keeping it alive.”

 

<> on September 27, 2017 in Washington, DC.“House chaplain prays to cast ‘spirits of darkness’ from Congress” – “House Chaplain Pat Conroy’s opening prayer: ‘This has been a difficult and contentious week in which darker spirits seem to have been at play in the people’s house. In Your most holy name, I now cast out all spirits of darkness from this chamber, spirits not from You.'”

 

gettyimages-613689090_wide-f793694fd7703b4ad760ad27c9ef4406d30abdee-s1400-c85“Democrats Have The Religious Left. Can They Win The Religious Middle?” – Via NPR: “Democrats this year are making a more determined effort to reach voters whose political preferences are driven in part by their religious faith. Two presidential candidates — Sen. Cory Booker and Mayor Pete Buttigieg — are recruiting faith advisers to help in their campaigns, and the Democratic National Committee has hired a new ‘faith engagement’ director, the Rev. Derrick Harkins….The new efforts have Democrats hopeful they can mobilize a religious left to counter the religious right, long a bedrock Republican constituency. Less clear is whether the outreach will resonate with those voters who make up the religious middle.”

 

91429“Pompeo: Why We’re Hosting the World’s Biggest Event on Religious Persecution” – From Christianity Today: “This week, the US State Department invited more than 100 countries to come to DC and discuss how to stop the dramatic decline of religious freedom worldwide. CT’s global director, Jeremy Weber, interviewed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on what has changed between last year’s first-ever ministerial on international religious freedom (IRF) and this week’s second, bigger event.”

 

Iraq ISIL“‘The situation is very vulnerable’: Iran-backed militias ethnically cleansing northern Iraq” – Given the discussion in the previous article, it is very pertinent to pay attention to what is happening in the Middle East in recent years. “The official story is that northern Iraq is at peace. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil) has largely been defeated; the Iraqi Army and its allies are in charge. But for Christians, the persecution continues. Those who can are getting out. Those who stay are preparing themselves for more violence.”

 

Michigan Central“Michigan Central and the rebirth of Detroit” – My wife, Kelly, is from Detroit, so we always keep our eyes and ears open to the challenges and hopes of Motor City. The BBC offered an insightful look through the lens of the Michigan Central Railway Station. “Michigan Central was once one of the grandest railway stations in the United States – the gateway to a fabulously wealthy city, dominated by the auto industry….But Detroit’s days of lavish prosperity are long gone. The station has been closed and abandoned for more than 30 years. Its tower, like the keep of a derelict fortress, is a poignant symbol of a once-great city’s decline. Now Michigan Central is being given a new life by the industry that created Detroit’s wealth.”

 

A visitor looks at the view of Fountains Abbey near Ripon, northern England“H. S. Cross’s Absorbing World” – John Wilson’s review of H. S. Cross‘ latest book, Grievous, makes me want to run out and read this book. As Wilson mentions in his review, many of his readers may not be familiar with Cross, myself included, but his are enough to pique my interest toward wading into this long work, as well as Cross’ previous novel, Wilberforce. If you’ve read either, let me know what you think.

 

giant jellyfish“Giant jellyfish the size of a human spotted by divers off English coast” – Sometimes truth is stranger than fiction and the seemingly infinite wonders of the created world are stunning. “A giant jellyfish the size of a human has stunned a diver off the south-western coast of England. The incredible creature — a barrel jellyfish — was spotted near Falmouth by broadcaster and biologist Lizzie Daly, who described the encounter as ‘breathtaking.'” Keep your eyes open the next time you go swimming.

 

paul-simon-and-son“Paul Simon: Fathers, Sons, Troubled Water” – Paul Simon’s album Graceland usually makes an appearance during our family roadtrips.  The range of musicianship and the strong song-writing still captures my attention. I read this article by Daniel Drake in The New York Review of Books awhile back but forgot about it until finding it in my electronic “To Read” pile the other day. He writes: “A consummate adult rather than a perpetual teenager, he sang about the compromises of apartment living, the journey through sobriety, divorce, breakdowns, second marriages, second divorces, fatherhood, depression, baseball. At their best, his songs have an erudite lyrical grace that had developed from a tendency to pretension in his early folk records and would shade in his later albums into mystic mumbo-jumbo.”

Music: It seems like it would be a shame not to share some Paul Simon. Here’s “Diamonds on the Soles of His Shoes,” from Graceland: The African Concert, featuring Ladysmith Black Mambazo.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 17 November 2018

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

181113-ebola-outbreak-congo-who-cs-1234p-3_0cdc1eae37b6711aeffb35064f16bd37.fit-1240w“Ebola outbreak in Congo likely to last 6 more months, WHO says” – This is devastating news for friends who are in this region. “The Ebola outbreak in northeastern Democratic Republic of Congo, which has already killed more than 200 people, is expected to last until mid-2019, a senior World Health Organization official said on Tuesday. ‘It’s very hard to predict time frames in an outbreak as complicated as this with so many variables that are outside our control,’ WHO emergency response chief Peter Salama told reporters, ‘but certainly we’re planning on at least another six months before we can declare this outbreak over.'” If you want to support the work in Congo, I highly recommend getting behind Congo Initiative, led by Drs. David and Kaswera Kasali[Thanks to Paul Sinclair for sharing this article with me.]

 

85237“Presbyterian Hostages Freed in Cameroon, But Conflict Carries On” – “Kidnappers released this week the last of more than 80 hostages taken from a Presbyterian school in Cameroon amid an escalating crisis in the Central African country’s English-speaking regions….And the kidnappings, as heart-wrenching as they are, represent just a small portion of the violence that has left the Anglophone region on the brink of civil war.”

 

pew-846021_640“A lot of white evangelical voters aren’t evangelicals” – There are polls and more polls around the concept of evangelical voters. I intentionally write ‘the concept of evangelical voters’ because I’m not sure some of the polls are getting at the right thing here. “Appearances can be deceiving, and in this case they are. That’s because a lot of the voters identified as white evangelicals weren’t Baptists, Pentecostals and non-denominational Christians. They were mainline Protestants and Catholics. Here’s how I know this.”

 

EvangelicalIconBanner_1400x400-1024x293“The Varieties of American Evangelicalism” – And since we’re talking about the difficulties of understanding ‘the concept of evangelical voters,’ I was happy to discover that USC’s Center for Religion and Civic Culture (CRCC) developed a study on the varieties of evangelicalism related to the politics. The CRCC outlines five types of evangelical voters: 1) Trump-vangelicals, 2) Neo-fundamentalists, 3) iVangelicals, 4) Kingdom Christians, and 5) Peace and Justice evangelicals. You will have to read the entire article if you want to understand this somewhat helpful lense on the topic.

 

7sRRdUyVEm2nvNWmOHfqlzl72eJkfbmt4t8yenImKBVvK0kTmF0xjctABnaLJIm9“How I Drew My Mental Map of Politics” – Still on that topic, Alan Jacobs shares his own journey of drawing his mental map of politics. This is, in many ways, a personal response to a conversation facilitated by Rod Dreher (“Your Political Mental Map”) happening over at The American Conservative, which really generates some fascinating conversation from his respondents. Here’s Dreher: “I’d like to start a thread about how the mental map we — that is, you readers and me — had laid down for us in childhood (up to age 21, let’s say) affected the way we see the world.”

 

85217“Mothers of the Reformation” – Kristen Padilla explores the ways in which Martin Luther’s doctrine of the priesthood of all believers shook the foundations of the world at its time. She asks a question rarely explored about the Reformation: “But could this priestly ministry even extend to women?” The rest of her article examines historical examples around this question. “Let’s look at the work of three women who broke the boundaries of their society by speaking out boldly through print, and how they appropriated Luther’s doctrine of the priesthood of all believers to defend their speaking.”

 

5373“And All Shall Be Well” – John Wilson glowingly reviews Timothy Larsen’s new biography of George MacDonald published by InterVarsity Press, George MacDonald in the Age of Miracles: Incarnation, Doubt, and Reenchantment. For those not familiar with George MacDonald, he was a Victorian-era pastor and author, whose imaginative works influenced many people. C. S. Lewis, in fact, was so deeply impacted by MacDonald’s Phantastes that in his introduction to George MacDonald: An Anthology he wrote: “Now Phantastes . . . had about it a sort of cool, morning innocence … What it actually did to me was to convert, even to baptise … my imagination.”

 

nazareth“The Emperor and the Empty Tomb: An Ancient Inscription, an Eccentric Scholar, and the Human Need to Touch the Past” – Over at The Los Angeles Review of Books, Kyle Harper takes stock of the Nazareth Inscription, which some purport to be the oldest archaeological link to Christianity. “Decades of scholarship have not yielded conclusive answers, and the original circumstances behind the Nazareth inscription may remain forever beyond our grasp. But any attempt to approach the ancient stone confronts its modern history — a story of this eccentric scholar, the vanished world of dealers, collectors, and savants in which he moved, and the enduring human need to touch the past.”

 

Screen Shot 2018-11-14 at 1.46.18 PM“The Writing and Legacy of Eugene Peterson with Drew Dyck” – Chase Replogle of the “Pastor Writer” podcast has a conversation with author and editor Drew Dyck about Eugene Peterson’s writing and legacy. This is a great reflection on Peterson’s unique ministry and calling as a pastor who was also a very gifted writer.

Screen Shot 2018-11-15 at 8.03.02 AM.pngNational Book Award Winners Announced – Since everyone reading this probably knows that I love books, I couldn’t fail to mention that recipients of the National Book Award here in the US were announced this week. There are five categories for the National Book award: fiction, nonfiction, poetry, translated literature, and young people’s literature. NPR has a nice feature on the uniqueness of this year’s awards recipients, as well as further news on national lifetime achievement awards.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]

The Weekend Wanderer: 10 November 2018

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

2018-09_ELS“Most Evangelical Leaders Identify as Independents” – In light of the elections this past week, the National Association of Evangelicals (NAE) shared a recent study indicating that two-thirds of evangelical leaders identify more as independents than purely with a political party. Leith Anderson, president of the NAE, said:“Most evangelical leaders prioritize their Christian identity over political party identity. Faith comes first whether independent, Democrat, Republican or another registration.” This is all fine and good, as long as this does not mean evangelical leaders fail to clearly address biblical issues with political ramifications.

 

webRNS-Copts-Massacre1-110518“Anger erupts in Egypt after massacre of Christian pilgrims” – Last Friday (November 2) near Minya, Egypt, a city south of Cairo, two buses carrying Coptic Christians were ambushed as they left a monastery, leaving seven people dead and wounding nineteen others. According to news sources, the Islamic State in Egypt has claimed responsibility for the attack.

 

69543“Bonhoeffer’s Answer to Political Turmoil: Preach!” – Ryan Hoselton’s offers a meaningful exploration of Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s preaching in light of the national and global turmoil related to the rise of The Third Reich in Germany.  Leaning into Bonhoeffer’s sermon, “Overcoming Fear,” delivered on January 15, 1933, Hoselton illustrates Bonhoeffer’s distinctive pastoral response to his circumstances. This reminds me of another book that I read a couple of years ago, Preaching in Hitler’s Shadow: Sermons of Resistance in the Third Reich, in which Dean Stroud points to a number of examples, including Bonhoeffer, Karl Barth, and Martin Niemöller, who spoke God’s word powerfully in the midst of political strife.

 

84341“A New Guild Aims to Equip Women and Amplify Orthodoxy”Christianity Today reports on The Pelican Project. “Two year ago, Karen Swallow Prior started fielding phone calls from women who all expressed the same desire: to find community among women united in their orthodox belief….A few months later, about 20 women from across the country met together to talk and pray about how to practice orthodoxy in the public square and how to equip the church to better disciple women in their midst. The group launched publicly this week as The Pelican Project.”

 

Churchome_virtual_church“Judah Smith Launches Church ‘in the palm of your hand’” – This past week, Judah Smith, pastor of Churchome (formerly ‘City Church’) announced via Twitter that the church’s latest “site” would be through an app on your smartphone. This move, listed as on of the locations on the church’s web-site, is dubbed “Churchome Global.” This is the utterly unsurprising to me, as it seems like the next logical move beyond online small groups or campuses resulting from the disincarnate, gnostic, North American evangelical church’s focus on “connection” and “reaching people.” Once again, this faddish push fails to realize that the “ends” do not justify the “means,” which violate the essential incarnational communion of an enfleshed Savior. Studies have shown that online “connection,” whether through social media or other means, usually contributes to increased levels of loneliness, stress, and depression. It is one thing to share information or resources online, but it is another thing to promise church (sanctorum communio) online.

 

Santa_Maria_Novella_Florence_façade“Sandals on the Ground: My Pilgrimage with the Sonnet”Jeanne Murray Walker writes about the challenges of hitting a wall as a poet, and how returning to the writing the classic form of the sonnet helped her. “That sunny fall morning was the first time I realized that I might not be a writer anymore. Or more terrifyingly, that I couldn’t write. After all, there does come a time in some writers’ lives when they inexplicably run out of ideas. Or words. Or metaphors. Or perhaps—this seemed like a dimmer possibility—something had depleted my passion to write….After publishing thirteen books, winning prizes and fellowships, and enjoying a career teaching poetry, I felt suddenly alone and terrified about my future as a writer.”

 

84337“CCDA President Noel Castellanos Resigns” – “On Tuesday morning, CCDA [Christian Community Development Association] announced that Castellanos had resigned prior to the 30th annual gathering, but the ministry’s board decided to wait until afterwards to announce his departure in a ‘sincere effort to keep the focus on this tremendous milestone as well as honor the life and commitment of our founder, Dr. John Perkins.’ Castellanos, who led the Christian justice ministry for more than a decade, spent the past two years engaged in a reconciliation process with former coworkers, according to CCDA.”

 

AdventResourceGuide2016“Advent Resource Guide” – The Calvin Institute of Christian Worship has pulled together this wonderful compilation of resources as we near Advent. You will find helpful resources for singing, preaching, visual arts, intergenerational worship, children’s ministry, and so much more.

 

freddie-mercury---barcelona“Freddie Mercury’s family faith: The ancient religion of Zoroastrianism – In light of the recent movie, Bohemian Rhapsody, about the English rock band Queen, this piece on lead singer, Freddie Mercury, took a religious spin. “It might come as a surprise to some that Freddie Mercury was born Farrokh Bulsara. He came from a Parsi family that had roots in India and he was a Zoroastrian by faith.”

 

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]