Bibliography for God in the Ruins: The Message of the Minor Prophets

When I conclude a sermon series, I usually share the resources I used to help me study and prepare my sermons. Here is that bibliography for our recently completed series, “God in the Ruins: The Message of the Minor Prophets.”

Bibliography for “God in the Ruins: The Message of the Minor Prophets”

Elizabeth Achtemeier. Minor Prophets I. NIBC. Peabody, MA: Hendrickson, 1996.

________. Preaching from the Minor Prophets. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1998.

Robert Alter. The Hebrew Bible, Volume 2: Prophets. New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2019.

Joyce G. Baldwin. Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi. TOTC. Downers Grove, IL: 1972.

Stuart Briscoe. Taking God Seriously: Major Lessons from the Minor Prophets. For Washington, PA: CLC Publications, 1986.

Andrew E. Hill and John H. Walton. “Introduction to Prophetic Literature.” In A Survey of the Old Testament. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2009.

Paul R. House. Old Testament Theology. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 2018.

Walter C. Kaiser. Preaching and Teaching from the Old Testament: A Guide for the Church. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker, 2003.

James Luther Mays. Hosea. OTL. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press, 1969.

A. Schart. “Twelve, Book of the: History of Interpretation.” In Dictionary of the Old Testament Prophets. Eds. Mark J. Boda and J. Gordon McConville. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 2012.

Douglas Stuart. Hosea-Jonah. WBC. Waco, TX: Word Books, 1987.

M. A. Sweeney. “Twelve, Book of the.” In Dictionary of the Old Testament Prophets. Eds. Mark J. Boda and J. Gordon McConville. Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity, 2012.

Bruce K. Waltke. A Commentary on Micah. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 2007.

Nicholas Wolterstorff. Justice: Rights and Wrongs. Princeton, NJ: Princeton U. P., 2008.

A Prayer inspired by the prophet Zechariah

Lord our God, you are great.
You are clothed with splendor and majesty,
glorious beyond our comprehending
and always worthy of praise.

Even as we seek You,
we admit our limitations.
Our life is like a vapor upon this earth,
yet You are eternal.
Our understanding is limited,
yet You are the all-wise God.
Like Job, we often speak words without knowledge
as we try to peer into Your ways that are higher than ours.

Give us vision, like Zechariah,
to see, through the mists of our limitations,
the glory of Your presence, blazing like the sun,
which brings light and life to all things.

Strengthen us to persevere in seeking You,
that, like a deer panting for streams of water,
our needy souls might be satisfied in You alone,
who is our Creator, Savior, and Sustainer.

All this we pray, through Jesus Christ,
to whom, with You and the Holy Spirit
be all honor and glory, now and forever.
Amen.

 


This is part of a series of posts with prayers based upon the message of the Minor Prophets:

Does God Still Speak Today?

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Working through a preaching series on the minor prophets, again and again I come across a phrase, “The word of the Lord that came to…”

That phrase appears more than twenty times in the minor prophets (at least 10 of those are in Zechariah alone!):

  • “The word of the Lord that came to Hosea son of Beeri” (Hosea 1:1)
  • “The word of the Lord that came to Joel son of Pethuel” (Joel 1:1)
  • “The word of the Lord came to Jonah son of Amittai” (Jonah 1:1)
  • “Then the word of the Lord came to Jonah a second time” (Jonah 3:1)
  • “The word of the Lord that came to Micah of Moresheth” (Micah 1:1)
  • “The word of the Lord that came to Zephaniah son of Cushi” (Zephaniah 1:1)
  • “the word of the Lord came through the prophet Haggai to Zerubbabel son of Shealtiel” (Haggai 1:1)
  • “the word of the Lord came to the prophet Haggai” (Haggai 2:10)
  • “The word of the Lord came to Haggai a second time” (Haggai 2:20)
  • “the word of the Lord came to the prophet Zechariah son of Berekiah, the son of Iddo” (Zechariah 1:1)
  • “Then the word of the Lord came to me” (Zechariah 4:8; 6:9)
  • “The word of the Lord to Israel through Malachi” (Malachi 1:1)

Many times the word was unexpected, but it was always clear.

We see this throughout the Bible, both in the Old and New Testaments, in characters like Noah, Moses, Hannah, David, Mary, Zechariah, Peter, and Paul. Again and again, we see these people having encounters with God that are clear, in which God clearly speaks to them and they are truly hearing from God.

This raises several questions for us about what it means to hear from God.  Over the course of the next week on my blog, I want to wrestle with a few of those questions as a way to engaging more deeply with God in a lively, dynamic relationship of faith. Here is the first question I want us to wrestle with today:

Can we hear God like the prophets and these many other characters in Scripture?  To put it another way: does God still speak to His people today as He did in Scripture?

This question immediately raises two more:

  • If no, why not?
  • If yes, how can we experience it?

So, let me do my best to walk through some answers to this question a little bit at a time.

Some would answer that question with a resounding “NO.”

  • No, God does not speak to us and we cannot hear Him today like the prophets and others in the Bible
  • The biblical characters are unique in a way that we are not
  • They received special revelation so that we don’t need to
  • The Bible is sufficient – it is enough – and we shouldn’t look for some additional revelation from God

But, I think that the answer to that question is YES.

  • Yes, God does speak to us and we can hear Him today in ways that are similar to the prophets and others in the Bible
  • The overwhelming testimony of Scripture is to a God who speaks
  • In fact, what sets the God of the Bible apart from other purported gods is that our God speaks, uniquely in words
    • Genesis – “And God said…” – God creates with words
    • Exodus – Sinai covenant and the Ten Commandments – God guides with words
    • Prophets – “The word of the Lord that came to…” – God corrects with words
    • Jesus – “the Word became flesh and made His dwelling among us” (John 1:14) – God is the Word
  • The overwhelming testimony of Scripture is that God speaks and Hs people listen
  • Jesus Himself said, “My sheep hear my voice. I know them, and they follow me. ” (John 10:27, NRSV).
  • That is also true in the history of God’s people after the time of the Bible– the pervasive testimony of Christians in history is that God speaks to His people
    • Augustine hears God speaking to Him through Scripture and the song of a child[1]
    • Teresa of Avila, a 16th century nun, speaks of hearing God and receiving visions from him[2]
    • Brother Lawrence, a 17th century French monk, speaks of developing a conversational relationship with God in the midst of his mundane duties, like washing dishes[3]
    • In more modern times, 20th century English evangelical writer Joyce Huggett tells of hearing the voice of God[4]
    • John Piper, a renowned conservative evangelical preacher and author, tells of clearly hearing the voice of God on March 19, 2007, in a way that changed his life.[5]

Again, our first question was “does God still speak to His people today as He did in Scripture?”  The testimony of Scripture itself and the history of God’s people over time and in various places is affirmative. Our God is a God who speaks, and we, His people, can hear His voice.

This, of course, raises the question: what does it mean to “hear God,” and to that question we will turn tomorrow.


[1] Augustine of Hippo, Confessions, VIII.29.

[2] Teresa of Avila, Autobiography and The Interior Castle.

[3] Brother Lawrence

[4] Joyce Huggett, The Joy of Listening to God (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 1986).

[5] John Piper, “The Morning I Heard the Voice of God,” March 21, 2007; https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/the-morning-i-heard-the-voice-of-god.

God in the Ruins: The Message of the Minor Prophets

This weekend at Eastbrook Church we began a new preaching series entitled “God in the Ruins: The Message of the Minor Prophets.”

At the end of the Hebrew Bible, our Old Testament, we find a collection of twelve small, yet powerful, books known as the Minor Prophets or “the Book of the Twelve.” The title “minor” refers to their length, and not to their significance, as each of these short books brings a powerful word from God to His people that challenges the status quo. As we walk through this entire collection, we will seek to hear God’s message to us today.

This series will eventually coincide with our Lenten journey to the Cross and Resurrection, with a devotional (more info to follow). Join us as we take a journey into the heart of God through this unique portion of the Scriptures.

An Angel at the Altar

Blake - Zecharias and the Angel.jpeg
William Blake, The Angel Appearing to Zacharias, pen and black ink, tempera, and glue size on canvas; 1799-1800.

an angel at the altar
heaven’s glory shatters earth’s sanctity
a voice indescribable yet understandable
a promise of hope unimaginable
confusion for old Zechariah
“our age – my wife – a baby – God – now?”
his call and God’s response
no utterance or voice now
his silence itself a testimony
that speaks of the ineffable
what has happened
what is happening
the first flutter of life within Elizabeth
gestates a voice of hope for humanity

 


 

I wrote these words after reading and reflecting on Luke 1:5-25 as part of my Advent readings. Zechariah has always struck me as a figure we all could relate to from Scripture. He encounters and angel of the Lord in the Temple, the place of all places that it seems like such a thing should happen. Yet Zechariah is so overwhelmed and confused by the message the angel brings that he doubts it could be possible. Struck dumb until the birth of the child, his silence becomes a message, even as the baby that his wife, Elizabeth, carries in her womb will be “a voice of one crying out,” directing attention to the Messiah. There is so much in here about speaking and silence, hearing and responding, as part of God’s work in relationship to humanity.