Institutional Repentance?

Brown University issued a report in October that brought light to its institutional ties to the slave trade and its efforts to move away from that through memorial and social justice efforts. While it is not unusual for organizations, including universities, to step away from socially unacceptable issues in the present, this is a new move on the part of universities to recognize past wrongs and seek reparations.

Is this a form of repentance or merely the window dressings on the same old institutional mannerisms? Will other universities follow suit in some way?

This idea led me to consider how our faith might impact systems. Is there a need for institutional repentance when institutions have done wrong at macro-levels?

4 thoughts on “Institutional Repentance?

  1. Ryan,

    Avery Cardinal Dulles is an outstanding contemporary Christian thinker. I particularly appreciated the following paragraph of that article:

    “[T]he Church needs a metanoia, that is, a discernment of the historical faults and failures of her members in responding to the demands of the gospel. Only the courageous admission of the faults and omissions of which Christians are judged to be guilty in some degree, and also the generous intention to make amends, with God’s help, can provide an efficacious initiative for the new evangelization and make the path to unity easier.”

  2. Ryan,

    Avery Cardinal Dulles is an outstanding contemporary Christian thinker. I particularly appreciated the following paragraph of that article:

    “[T]he Church needs a metanoia, that is, a discernment of the historical faults and failures of her members in responding to the demands of the gospel. Only the courageous admission of the faults and omissions of which Christians are judged to be guilty in some degree, and also the generous intention to make amends, with God’s help, can provide an efficacious initiative for the new evangelization and make the path to unity easier.”

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