Maundy Thursday 2019

Shortly before His arrest and crucifixion, Jesus gathered with His closest disciples in an upper room in Jerusalem to share the Passover meal together. During that time, Jesus washed His disciples’ feet and taught them deep truths of God’s kingdom. 

Join us for a Maundy Thursday service of worship with foot washing and communion at Eastbrook Church on Thursday, April 18, at 7 PM in Fellowship Hall.  Here is a video that our staff put together on the meaning of Maundy Thursday.

 

C. T. Studd, “Only One Life”

image 9 - C T Studd.jpgIn my message this past weekend at Eastbrook, “The Hunger to Leave a Legacy,” I reflected on the life of C. T. Studd, a famous 19th century Cambridge cricket player turned missionary. After becoming a follower of Jesus, Studd left England to serve as a missionary in China, under the oversight of Hudson Taylor. After a decade in China, Studd went on to serve in India for seven years and 20 years in sub-Saharan Africa, beginning in the Belgian Congo.

When asked about his passion for mission, Studd offered a memorable response, which has inspired many missionaries since his time:

Some want to live within the sound of church or chapel bell; I want to run a rescue shop within a yard of hell.

A poem he wrote, entitled “Only One Life,” holds two lines which summarize Studd’s legacy and are a good model for us as believers today:

Only one life, ‘twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last

I’ve included the entire poem below.

Two little lines I heard one day,
Traveling along life’s busy way;
Bringing conviction to my heart,
And from my mind would not depart;
Only one life, twill soon be past,

Only what’s done for Christ will last.
Only one life, yes only one,
Soon will its fleeting hours be done;
Then, in ‘that day’ my Lord to meet,
And stand before His Judgement seat;
Only one life,’twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, the still small voice,
Gently pleads for a better choice
Bidding me selfish aims to leave,
And to God’s holy will to cleave;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, a few brief years,
Each with its burdens, hopes, and fears;
Each with its clays I must fulfill,
living for self or in His will;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last.

When this bright world would tempt me sore,
When Satan would a victory score;
When self would seek to have its way,
Then help me Lord with joy to say;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Give me Father, a purpose deep,
In joy or sorrow Thy word to keep;
Faithful and true what e’er the strife,
Pleasing Thee in my daily life;
Only one life, ’twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Oh let my love with fervor burn,
And from the world now let me turn;
Living for Thee, and Thee alone,
Bringing Thee pleasure on Thy throne;
Only one life, “twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last.

Only one life, yes only one,
Now let me say,”Thy will be done”;
And when at last I’ll hear the call,
I know I’ll say “twas worth it all”;
Only one life,’twill soon be past,
Only what’s done for Christ will last. ”

The Hunger to Leave a Legacy [Hungry for God]

As we enter into Holy Week and bring the climax to our Lenten journey, I concluded our series, “Hungry for God,” this past weekend at Eastbrook Church.

This weekend I explored the hunger to leave a legacy. Because this was Palm Sunday, I intertwined the exploration of legacy with Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem. This would definitely not be my normal manner of approaching the topic of legacy, but I went for it and you can explore it with me through the message video and sermon outline below. You can follow the entire series at our web-site, through the Eastbrook app, or through our audio podcast.

Read More »

Hungry to Leave a Legacy

the-hunger-for-legacy-wk-6-01.png

About a year ago, our family went on a trip to Washington, DC, to take in the historic sites and museums. One thing you cannot help but notice are the monuments to one historic figure after another: George Washington, John F. Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Jr., and so many more Each monument tells a story about the legacy of how those figures impacted the nation and generations of people.

We all hunger to leave a legacy with our lives in one form or another. Most of us may not aspire to constructing a monument to our personal legacy in Washington, DC, (let alone somewhere else) but we all still desire to leave a meaningful legacy with our lives. In Ecclesiastes, the Teacher says that God has “set eternity in the human heart” (Ecclesiastes 3:11). In our hearts God has placed a sense of the eternal, and that sense of eternity connects with our hunger to endure and to leave something that endures after we die.

This hunger to leave a legacy is a gift from God, but it can be bent toward wrong ends. We all know the stories of someone who seems fixated on being important, being remembered, or being praised after death. Ironically, this prideful fixation on being remembered often makes a person sadly forgettable or humorously entertaining. The heart that is rightly ordered with God allows God to build His own legacy in our lives for His glory. As the Psalmist writes: “we will tell the next generation the praiseworthy deeds of the Lord, his power, and the wonders he has done” (Psalm 78:4).

In this week’s devotional we will explore how to leave a legacy in our lives that is neither prideful nor laughable, but honoring to God and His ways.

RESPOND THIS WEEK:
Each week’s practice will feature some aspect of the process Paul describes for us in Ephesians 4:22-24, where we are to TAKE OFF something from our lives that has become corrupted or distracting and PUT ON in its place something God wants us to do.

Take Off:Fast from social media, or some other place where you seek recognition from others, during this week. Choose not to post to your social media accounts this week or check your feeds.

Put On: Replace your time spent on social media with time listening to God. Ask Him to point out someone you can serve in secret this week. Plan a way to bless them in some tangible way.

[This a devotional I wrote with Jim Caler as part of the Eastbrook Church Lenten devotional, “Hungry for God.”]

The Weekend Wanderer: 13 April 2019

The Weekend Wanderer” is a weekly curated selection of news, stories, resources, and media on the intersection of faith and culture for you to explore through your weekend. Wander through these links however you like and in any order you like.

 

90144“Iraqi Christians in the US Face Deportation Again” – From Christianity Today: “Hundreds of Iraqi Christians detained in immigration raids are once again at risk of deportation after losing their chance to keep fighting their cases in court. On Tuesday, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals closed the book on Hamama v. Adducci, a class-action lawsuit filed in June 2017 by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) on behalf of 1,400 Iraqi natives, including more than 100 Detroit-area Chaldean Christians, who were detained by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement and told they would be repatriated to their home country.”

 

Screen Shot 2019-04-11 at 10.19.17 AM“A man arrested in connection with the Louisiana black church fires” – “Officials with knowledge of the investigation told CNN on Wednesday night that a 21-year old man from St. Landry Parish was arrested in connection with the fires….St. Mary Baptist Church in Port Barre burned on March 26, followed by Greater Union Baptist Church in Opelousas on April 2 and two days later, Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in the same town. The fires are believed to have been intentionally set, a local elected official said Tuesday.”

 

10BLACKHOLEPHOTO-superJumbo-v3“Black Hole Picture Revealed for the First Time” – “Astronomers announced on Wednesday that at last they had seen the unseeable: a black hole, a cosmic abyss so deep and dense that not even light can escape it. ‘We’ve exposed a part of our universe we’ve never seen before,’ said Shep Doeleman, an astronomer at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, and director of the effort to capture the image, during a Wednesday news conference in Washington, D.C.”

 

Ajith Fernando“Allegiance to Scripture, Respect for Culture” – Jaclyn Parrish reviews Ajith Fernando’s new book Discipling in a Multicultural World. Throughout his pastoral ministry and work with Youth for Christ in Sri Lanka Fernando has been a voice for relational discipleship and ministry that is focused on the right things. “Ajith Fernando’s Discipling in a Multicultural World is by no means the final word on discipleship, cross-cultural or otherwise. Nevertheless, the Sri Lankan church leader provides principles that are both biblically sound and readily applicable in any corner of our increasingly multicultural world.”

 

The Moviegoer - Walker Percy“We Still Live Within the Mediated, Alienated World of ‘The Moviegoer'” – Over at The New Yorker, Paul Elie reflects about the continued significance of Walker Percy and his novel The Moviegoer, for our current culture: “‘The Moviegoer” isn’t really about movies, and yet the title remains unexpectedly apt, just as it was when the novel, published in 1961, became a surprise winner of the National Book Award and made a sudden Southern eminence of its author, Walker Percy, a nonpracticing physician and self-taught philosopher in early middle age. It’s apt because it moves the novel (and our expectations for the novel) out of the South. It intimates that this novel, set in New Orleans, the region’s most storied city, isn’t about history or legacy, isn’t about place at all: it’s about how we see things—a novel of perception and sensibility, dealing with the search for authenticity in a scripted, stylized, mediated world.”

 

WomenSaints“These Women Played An Enormous Role in Shaping Christianity—Do You Know Their Names?” – Riffing off of Hebrews 11 and 12, Amy Davis Abdallah offers a roll-call of great women who shaped our faith. Stretching from Lydia and Priscilla in the New Testament all the way through the history of the church in the contemporary era, you will not want to miss this celebration of great Christian women, many of whom we may not know.

 

hiding“Does Ministry Fuel Addictive Behavior?” – Here’s an article from Christianity Today in 2006, which is still as relevant today. “In a recent issue of Leadership, Sally Morgenthaler shared the story of her husband’s sexual addiction that resulted in a felony conviction and years in prison. Through that painful experience, Morgenthaler came to see how pastoral ministry can actually contribute to the addictive behaviors that destroy many pastors and their families.”

 

robinson-and-williams“Faith, imagination, and the glory of ordinary life” – The Christian Century carried a transcript of a conversation between novelist Marilynne Robinson and theologian Rowan Williams. This conversation took place at Wheaton College’s annual theology conference, which focused on the theological significance of Robinson’s work.

 

Music: Franz Joseph Haydn, The Seven Last Words of Our Savior on the Cross (1787), performed by The Navarra Quartet.

[I do not necessarily agree with all the views expressed within the articles linked from this page, but I have read them myself in order to make me think more deeply.]